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A hilltop escape with that healing feeling

Cult fear as stars make new Friends

An obscure religious group is attracting some big names, reports Cole Moreton

Preview: Meditate The psychic and the yogi

Controversial psychic Yuri Geller conspires with veteran meditator Dadi Janki tomorrow "to show how deeply refreshing it is when thoughts of peace fill the mind". The meeting will also aim to use the power of the mind to unlock our hidden potential. Will it work? Well, if the force is with you, should already know.

You're famous aren't you? Er, what was your name again?

Trevor Phillips On the art of fame

Sarah's secret garden

THE INVISIBLE MENDER by Sarah Maguire, Cape pounds 7

How good a News Bunny are you?

How well do you keep up with the news? Are you reasonably aware of what is going on in the world? Well, here's a swift way of finding out if you are or not.

DANCE Mandala Peacock Theatre

Daniel Ezralow has a CV as long as his raven curls. A former member of Pilobolus and the Paul Taylor Dance Company, and co-founder of the dance spectacle outfit Momix, Ezralow has worked on everything from paralympic opening ceremonies to commercials for The Gap and Tao Yoghurt. His current abiding interest is in the creation of multimedia events that assault the senses with a synaesthetic bombardment of images and sounds. His latest show, Mandala - a Sanskrit word for a circular representation of the universe used as an aid to meditation - is enjoying a three-week run at London's Peacock Theatre.

Cross your legs and hope to die laughing

For more and more Britons it is not Easter Day but Sangha Day, Dhama Day and Wesak Day that are the most important dates in the religious calendar.

Leading Article: Millennial dilemmas

How would you celebrate the millennium? Some would like to build a vast inverted saucer with a lot of gigantic cocktail sticks poking out the top. Others suggest a vast street party (on the M1, perhaps?) or rides on a Ferris wheel higher than St Paul's.

I'm sorry, did I hear you correctly?

Yesterday morning I received a letter from Mr Topham of Herne Bay that started:

review Orlando Royal Lyceum

Taking an Elizabethan noble boy on a gender-bending, fantastical, 300-year voyage into 20th-century womanhood, Virginia Woolf's Orlando has itself a diverse identity. It is many things: a lengthy lesbian love letter to Vita Sackville-West; a slyly seditious reworking of the conventions of male biography; a feminist meditation on gender and cultural conditioning; and a celebration of the androgenous spirit.

Marbly limbs and mother's milk

Each generation of poets brings its own preoccupations to its depictions of the body. The Metaphysicals turned their mistresses into maps or diagrams, the late Victorians were obsessed with anything poking out of robes, with warm breath and marbly limbs, Eliot lingered on decay. For today's poets, the body is oozing, breeding, sexual and often examined in scientific detail.

SPORTING VERNACULAR No 3 SEEDS

"And when the sun was up, they were scorched; and because they had no root, they withered away": Andre Agassi could do worse than meditate on the parable of the sower as he leaves Wimbledon, verily a seed that fell on stony ground - in his case Court Number Two, a patch of soil that has proved notably infertile for other seeds before him.

When a spade is not a spade

When a spade is not a spade

BOOKS : Visionary in a red gown

THIS second novel vaults over the difficulty traditionally associated with following up a successful debut. Swirling around nationalist and international politics, government brutality and corruption, it creates a rich impressionist landscape of a society in the throes of rapid and violent change, filtering economics and ideologies through the visions of childhood. The machinations of men in power are presented as both absurd and cruel: magical realism, here, is invented by politicians. The exuberance and extravagance of the images function as satire. This imaginary Guyana is both real and very weird.

DANCE TICKET OFFER: SMALL BONES

Tonight is the final chance to catch the London premiere of two works from Small Bones dance company, which form part of the 1996 Spring Loaded Season at London's Place Theatre. Two contemporary scores and works of literature serve as the points of departure for A Heart Undone and The Songlines, choreographed by Paul Douglas. A Heart Undone is influenced by fables and their meditation between life and death, while The Songlines reflects Chatwin's novel of the same name.
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders
Heston Blumenthal to cook up a spice odyssey for British astronaut manning the International Space Station

UK's Major Tum to blast off on a spice odyssey

Nothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
John Harrison's 'longitude' clock sets new record - 300 years on

‘Longitude’ clock sets new record - 300 years on

Greenwich horologists celebrate as it keeps to within a second of real time over a 100-day test
Fears in the US of being outgunned in the vital propaganda wars by Russia, China - and even Isis - have prompted a rethink on overseas broadcasters

Let the propaganda wars begin - again

'Accurate, objective, comprehensive': that was Voice of America's creed, but now its masters want it to promote US policy, reports Rupert Cornwell
Why Japan's incredible long-distance runners will never win the London Marathon

Japan's incredible long-distance runners

Every year, Japanese long-distance runners post some of the world's fastest times – yet, come next weekend, not a single elite competitor from the country will be at the London Marathon
Why does Tom Drury remain the greatest writer you've never heard of?

Tom Drury: The quiet American

His debut was considered one of the finest novels of the past 50 years, and he is every bit the equal of his contemporaries, Jonathan Franzen, Dave Eggers and David Foster Wallace
You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

Dave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
Beige is back: The drab car colours of the 1970s are proving popular again

Beige to the future

Flares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's dishes highlight the delicate essence of fresh cheeses

Bill Granger cooks with fresh cheeses

More delicate on the palate, milder, fresh cheeses can also be kinder to the waistline
Aston Villa vs Liverpool: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful,' says veteran Shay Given

Shay Given: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful'

The Villa keeper has been overlooked for a long time and has unhappy memories of the national stadium – but he is savouring his chance to play at Wembley
Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own - Michael Calvin

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own