Mick Jagger

The Feral Beast: Jungle Beatles, lazy mandarins, a quartet of corgis,

Michael Gove is a no-nonsense sort of chap, unafraid to shake his fist at the Human Rights Act. In 2011, the Education Secretary vowed to crack down on unruly pupils, whatever Europe said about their rights, and last year he led the cabinet's huffing and puffing when it looked as if Abu Qatada couldn't be deported. So how surprising to learn he is the trustee of a charity dedicated to promoting, er, human rights! The Charity Commission lists Gove as one of only two trustees of something called the European Freedom Fund. The other is the neocon writer and activist Douglas Murray. Their objective is "the promotion of respect for human rights as set out in the European Convention of Human Rights and fundamental freedoms adopted by the members of the council of Europe on 4th November 1950 and the convention's five protocols". This could put Gove in a tricky position when the Tories come to replacing the Human Rights Act with a British Bill of Rights. Still, the EFF hasn't been too busy: no money has gone in or out since it was founded in 2007. Molto strano!

Bonnet rippers: a new kind of romantic fiction

This week I learnt about a new genre of literature. In a fascinating article in the LA Review of Books, writer Valerie Weaver-Zercher explored the growing popularity of Amish romance novels (including the ones pictured). The headline? Bonnet Rippers. I LOVE it. An update on the bodice ripper, but so much more chaste.

Shine a light... on the Rolling Stones: Bill Wyman's photography

The Stones' drummer, Charlie Watts, gazes sardonically into the camera, relaxed and unguarded. In this case, the photographer was his bandmate Bill Wyman, who played bass for the band for 30 years, before leaving in 1993. Now Wyman has delved into his archives to showcase unseen pictures from four decades in a new exhibition beginning in London this week.

Louis Walsh hints at X-Factor exit

X Factor judge Louis Walsh has suggested that he will bow out of the show after 10 years because he does not want to turn into Sir Bruce Forsyth.

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Politicians: Sing when you're winning... or not

Who knew Barack Obama could be a one-man stimulus package for a beleaguered music industry? When the US President belted out a couple of lines of Al Green's "Let's Stay Together" at a fundraiser last month, sales of the track soared by almost 500 per cent. Now the blues classic "Sweet Home Chicago" can expect a boost after Obama confirmed his singing chops with an impromptu performance at the White House.