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Outlook A two-footed tackle from behind in football is an aggressive and stupid play because it's liable to leave your team with 10 men. You'd think Mike Ashley would understand that, owning a football team and a sports retailer as he does. But apparently not.

Equestrianism: Tait's title but British excel

BLYTH TAIT regained the world title he won eight years ago in Stockholm after steering his Olympic champion, Ready Teddy, to the smoothest of clear rounds in yesterday's final show jumping phase of the three-day event at the World Equestrian Games here.

Software: A new Office romance

David Fox reviews Microsoft's Mac-loving Office 98 program

Financial secretaries: It pays to be smart in the City; City employers expect staff to have a thorough knowledge of computer software

City+: In the Square Mile your day will rarely go to plan. Annabelle Thorpe talks to the women who keep the wheels of commerce turning

Suite dreams

Office 97

Portable powerhouses

Nick Edmunds reviews the latest notebooks to top the league in PC Magazine

Working out at night school

The machines at the Link FITness club are not for pumping iron, as Dorothy Walker finds out

'So my first question is: what is a CD-Rom?'

They're not just for storing Delia Smith recipes and playing games

briefs: Your number's up

Your number's up

Edinburgh Festival: Stop Calling Me Vernon

Everything fine you've ever heard about the clowning Right Size Company is squeezed in here. Sean Foley and Hamish McColl excel as a third-rate vaudeville act, practising cheesy routines and bickering until their big break arrives. Their willingness to be physically abused is matched only by the inventiveness of their props: a duvet with pillows strapped to their heads and a tiny elastic-hung door are everyday objects in Austin and Porter's implausible world. This is gifted tomfoolery.

Computers: Software with a basic instinct for figures: Spreadsheets are super at calculating figures and excel at presenting them. But Andrew Brown finds they can also complicate matters

THE MAIN reason I use a spreadsheet is that it makes indecent suggestions in the voice of the villainess from Basic Instinct, something accountants too seldom do in my experience.

Home Computer: Open Forum

I think that I may be able to help your correspondents Jane Dalton and M Davies over their problems with diacritical signs (accents) in foreign-language word-processing.
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Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza

Andrew Grice: Inside Westminster

Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza
HMS Victory: The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

Exclusive: David Keys reveals the research that finally explains why HMS Victory went down with the loss of 1,100 lives
Survivors of the Nagasaki atomic bomb attack: Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism

'I saw people so injured you couldn't tell if they were dead or alive'

Nagasaki survivors on why Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism
Jon Stewart: The voice of Democrats who felt Obama had failed to deliver on his 'Yes We Can' slogan, and the voter he tried hardest to keep onside

The voter Obama tried hardest to keep onside

Outgoing The Daily Show host, Jon Stewart, became the voice of Democrats who felt the President had failed to deliver on his ‘Yes We Can’ slogan. Tim Walker charts the ups and downs of their 10-year relationship on screen
Satya Nadella: As Windows 10 is launched can he return Microsoft to its former glory?

Satya Nadella: The man to clean up for Windows?

While Microsoft's founders spend their billions, the once-invincible tech company's new boss is trying to save it
A Very British Coup, part two: New novel in pipeline as Jeremy Corbyn's rise inspires sequel

A Very British Coup, part two

New novel in pipeline as Jeremy Corbyn's rise inspires sequel
Philae lander data show comets could have brought 'building blocks of life' to Earth

Philae lander data show comets could have brought 'building blocks of life' to Earth

Icy dust layer holds organic compounds similar to those found in living organisms
What turns someone into a conspiracy theorist? Study to look at why some are more 'receptive' to such theories

What turns someone into a conspiracy theorist?

Study to look at why some are more 'receptive' to such theories
Chinese web dissenters using coded language to dodge censorship filters and vent frustration at government

Are you a 50-center?

Decoding the Chinese web dissenters
The Beatles film Help, released 50 years ago, signalled the birth of the 'metrosexual' man

Help signalled birth of 'metrosexual' man

The Beatles' moptop haircuts and dandified fashion introduced a new style for the modern Englishman, says Martin King
Hollywood's new diet: Has LA stolen New York's crown as the ultimate foodie trend-setter?

Hollywood's new diet trends

Has LA stolen New York's crown as the ultimate foodie trend-setter?
6 best recipe files

6 best recipe files

Get organised like a Bake Off champion and put all your show-stopping recipes in one place
Ashes 2015: Steven Finn goes from being unselectable to simply unplayable

Finn goes from being unselectable to simply unplayable

Middlesex bowler claims Ashes hat-trick of Clarke, Voges and Marsh
Mullah Omar, creator of the Taliban, is dead... for the fourth time

Mullah Omar, creator of the Taliban, is dead... again

I was once told that intelligence services declare their enemies dead to provoke them into popping up their heads and revealing their location, says Robert Fisk
Margaret Attwood on climate change: 'Time is running out for our fragile, Goldilocks planet'

Margaret Atwood on climate change

The author looks back on what she wrote about oil in 2009, and reflects on how the conversation has changed in a mere six years