Life and Style The Spring/Summer 2014 collection of Giorgio Armani during Milan Fashion Week showed that the style’s true inspiration was Armani himself

There was certainly a lightness, reflected in the fluidity and fragility of fabrics

The age of indignity

They hit 30 and it's down with the neckline, up with the skirt and out on the town. They call it 'middle youth'. Hettie Judah calls it embarrassing

Fashion: The Style Police - Glad to be grey

We all know grey is this season's hot colour. Only trouble is, it's not very sexy. James Sherwood goes in search of some 'va-va-voom'

D&G put traditional seal on Milan collection

ITALIAN designers flew the flag at Milan Fashion Week yesterday. Dolce e Gabbana's floral collection for autumn/winter '98 was inspired by a walk through a Mediterranean garden, making use of some of the country's traditional handicrafts including hand-painted fabrics from Como, local embroideryand Sicilian fringed scarves.

Fashion: Milan Diary: Dressing to iron is rather smooth

MILAN Fashion Week, and shopping frenzy is in the air. British designers are known for their challenging ideas, but in Milan all of that goes right out of the window. Ideas are replaced by shopping lists, as the fashion press concentrate on how they can update their wardrobes.

Fashion: They seek him here, they seek him there

He's rumoured to have been in talks with Donatella Versace. His name has been top of a whole host of design houses' hit lists all in search of a designer, from Givenchy, Balenciaga, Celine, Chloe and Lanvin in Paris to Iceberg, Cerruti, Etro and Sergio Rossi in Italy, not to mention the latest offer from TSE, the New York-based cashmere company. Oh, and John Lewis approached him with a deal to design a capsule collection for the department store. He was even recently rung by the fashion trade paper Women's Wear Daily to ask him if he had been approached by the House of Chanel before Karl Lagerfeld re-signed a contract for another five years. He's turned down more offers than you can count on two hands, not to mention the bungled British Fashion Awards title of Lloyd's Bank New Generation Designer for 1997. Antonio Berardi is a mere 26, less than four years out of Central Saint Martin's, and a name to be reckoned with - invited to dinner with Madonna, no less - although, he says, he is still finding his feet.

Fashion: Donatella and Demi, women in black

Paris is art, ideas, imagination. Milan is, give or take the brilliant Dolce e Gabbana, slickness, flashiness and commerce. Except this time - this time it is emotion, a wake for Gianni. Fashion's most famous mourners will be there. And then there is his sister Donatella. Her moment has come through tragedy. But, asks Tamsin Blanchard, will she rise to it?

MODERN MISSONI

For the ultimate in Nineties glamour, all you have to do is put on your cardigan, says Tamsin Blanchard

Modelled on the catwalks of Milan ... coming soon to Britain's high streets

Milan fashion week focuses around the collections of just a handful of designers who are some of the most influential and directional in the world. The clothes they send down the catwalk this week will be absorbed by magazine stylists, photographers and other image makers, as well as by the companies that mass manufacture High Street clothes that don't cost the earth and that most people buy and wear.

The Gilbert & George of fashion

Madonna thinks they're the greatest. Others have branded them pornographers. Now Dolce & Gabbana are bringing their clothes - bras and basques a speciality - direct to London

Fashion: Linda shapes up and goes to Hollywood: We've seen that curvy look before . . . Marilyn's made a comeback. And the Duracell-powered ultramodel is changing her image with the times again. Marion Hume reports from Milan

LINDA Evangelista's dye job is the most talked about sight of the spring/summer 1995 Milan shows. In part, that is because the wearable clothes have been rather uninspired. But it is also because of her persistent knack of turning herself into a sort of shorthand for the prevailing trend - which right now is for larger- than-life Hollywood fantasy.

The world according to Dolce & Gabbana: Trouser suits won the wearability award on the first day of Milan fashion week. Marion Hume reports

THE CATWALK show of Madonna's costumiers, Dolce & Gabbana, opening Milan fashion week, took us on a voyage across the high seas with an outfit from every port.

Season opens for UFOs and the fabulous: The international catwalk circuit begins today, with styles ranging from the sublime to the unidentifiable fashion object

AND WE'RE OFF. The fashion season, which will take us through Milan, Paris, London and New York, starts this morning at 10.30am Italian time. It finishes in Manhattan when Donna Karan walks out to take her after-show bow at some time after 6pm on 5 November.

Fashion: The multi-layered genius of Ozbek: The British designer of the year has shown Versace and Armani the way to go, says Marion Hume in Milan

A bald Londoner called Eve swaggered out first in front of an audience accustomed to models with neat chignons. She wore an ankle-skimming regimental coat, an exotically embroidered gilet and a fluid batik-inspired peasant skirt. And by the time Naomi Campbell - in a sliver of a sheath dress that lapped her body like molten gold - brought Rifat Ozbek's show to a close on Tuesday, the British Designer of the Year had conquered Milan.
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