Oasis

Where did it all go wrong for Britpop?

1997: when 3 Colours Red were the next Oasis and no one had heard of digital piracy. Craig McLean was right there, and as the forthcoming film 'Kill Your Friends' revisits the last, deluded golden age of the British record industry, he recalls the excess, the greed, and the hangover

Album review: Jake Bugg, Shangri La, Virgin/EMI

If the challenge faced by Jake Bugg on his second album is to prove you can take the boy out of Clifton (the Nottingham council estate where he was born) without taking all traces of Clifton out of the boy, then it’s one he rises to. Those who see Bugg’s so-called “authenticity” — whatever that means — as a storm of hype might spy signs of “grooming” in the decision to record in LA with producer Rick Rubin, but the follow-up to his hit debut makes the Midlands-to-Malibu move look largely seamless: as an exercise in expanded range, Shangri La is too diverse and distinct to dismiss.

Music review: Keane, Kenwood House, London

All kinds of shenanigans go on in Hampstead Heath after dark, so it’s perhaps no surprise to find long-term critical whipping boys Keane performing in one of its more secluded corners.

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Gig review: Richard Hawley, Somerset House, London

Dressed in black and protected by fifties-style shades, Richard Hawley explains the inspiration behind 'Don't Stare At The Sun': the mundane act of taking his youngest son kite flying. “What made it interesting was I was off me head on fucking acid”.

Nicky Haslam, renaissance man: The interior designer has released an

Nicky Haslam is a man unafraid to wear a number of hats (figurative and literal, that is). But the 73-year-old’s latest venture just might be his strangest yet. The interior designer (full name: Nicholas Ponsonby Haslam), who also includes socialite, artist, book reviewer, art editor, cabaret singer, memoirist and literary editor in his list of achievements – he really does, it’s on his website – has just put out an album.