• Review

Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, Glyndebourne

David McVicar’s Glyndebourne production of Die Meistersinger premiered in 2011 to a deafening chorus of approval, but that was before people had seen Richard Jones’s production for Welsh National Opera. While McVicar set the work in a lovingly recreated city of Wagner’s time, Jones adopted a delicately surreal approach that allowed him to rivetingly illuminate Wagner’s elaborate affirmation of the power of love and creativity.

Turning up the voice of America

The warm crackle and hiss of AM radio lives on in the US, and is about to get a boost that could put it back at the heart of communities

Classical review: Orfeo, Academy of Ancient Music/Egarr

Britain’s first Academy of Ancient Music was founded in 1726 as a private club of singers meeting in a London tavern to entertain each other: ‘ancient’ meant anything not in the contemporary repertory. Britain’s second AAM was founded in 1973 by harpsichordist Christopher Hogwood, to perform what was now called ‘early music’ on original instruments. Over the past four decades they have helped revolutionise early-music performance, blazing a trail followed by Baroque ensembles everywhere.

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American Lulu, Edinburgh International Festival, Kings Theatre

Atonal opera is never the easiest performance to love. An atonal opera reconceived in the jazz style, about a charmless woman devoid of redeeming features, shoehorned into a clunky political setting, performed for almost two hours without an interval, has everything to do.

Classical review: Tosca - Adam Spreadbury-Maher's production doesn't

OperaUpClose specialises in bold transpositions, best exemplified by its witty setting of Verdi’s Un ballo in maschera in an IKEA store. For Tosca their writer-director Adam Spreadbury-Maher has effected a different kind of transposition, but one which is entirely logical.