Sport Chris Chataway was the first winner of the BBC’s Sports Personality of the Year in 1954

Murray may well be named BBC Sports Personality of the Year tonight, but he won’t be there

Scientists face 'shocking levels' of vilification over discoveries

Scientists are being subjected to shocking levels of personal vilification and distrust, Britain's most senior scientist has warned.

Paul Smith looks sharp as profits rise 18 per cent to £21m

The upmarket fashion retailer Paul Smith said it defied the economic downturn to deliver a sharp rise in annual profits, driven by a strong performance in Britain and overseas. The company, founded by the legendary Nottingham-born designer Sir Paul Smith, also increased its turnover, despite wholesale orders slipping.

Paul McCartney, Academy, Liverpool

Paul McCartney's 35-song set is just brilliant... and the guitar's holding up too

100 Club gets a little help from a friend

It takes a worthy cause to get an old Beatle on such a small stage.

Sir Paul McCartney to play gig at threatened club

Sir Paul McCartney is to play his smallest show for more than a decade - with a gig for just 300 people at threatened punk venue the 100 Club.

My Secret Life: Lucy Porter, comedian, 37

My parents were ... Maurice and Rita. They were, and are, the best in the world. I have no complaints about the genes I've inherited, even the ones that make me short and prone to ear infections.

FAB: An Intimate Life of Paul McCartney by Howard Sounes

Reading this book, listening to his post-Beatles music, it's hard to disagree with David Puttnam – that Paul McCartney is a man of "immense, immense, immense talent" unable to make the crucial extra effort that would transform the merely good into the exceptional. "Was it that it was too hard, was it that it was too challenging? Or was it that he was a reasonably contented guy and he didn't think it was worth putting himself through that amount of pain? But the difference between good and great is that last 15 per cent." Puttnam believes he has not "absolutely delivered what was in [him]".

Brian Clarke

In last Saturday's article, 'We had a private conversation. I was moved by his modesty', we described Brian Clarke's meeting with the Pope and the item was labelled 'First Person'. We should have made clear it was based on an interview given by Brian Clarke to our journalist rather than being written by Brian Clarke himself. Brian Clarke did not introduce the names of Paul McCartney or Francis Bacon but merely responded to questions put to him by the journalist. We are happy to make this clear.

Diary: Bell rings well for Paul

Having ably steered the Paul McCartney publicity machine in recent years, there's little sign of the former Beatle's media man Stuart Bell putting a foot wrong. With Sir Paul having parted company with his last long-term PR lackey, Geoff Baker, back in 2004 following a fall-out, Bell has proved a valuable ally – credited, not least, with ensuring that the songwriter emerged smelling of roses after his divorce from the helpfully bonkers Heather Mills. Perhaps not surprisingly, Bell's occasional online column about life with Saint Macca, charmingly entitled For Whom The Bell Tells, is never in danger of going off-message. "Here in the newsroom we've now read literally thousands of amazing live reviews of our man and his band and we're convinced that no other artist in the world receives such mind-boggling write-ups," we're informed. "It's simply unprecedented," he adds. With McCartney now reportedly due to make an inevitably cringeworthy cameo on the hip young drama Glee, dare Bell tell his elderly client it's a rubbish idea?

Fiona Reynolds: 'In difficult times, simple pleasures are important'

An ever-expanding National Trust is playing a crucial role in people's lives, its director general, Fiona Reynolds, tells Andy McSmith

Diary: 'Take 35' for film star Carla

Gleeful reports in the British press this week regarding Carla Bruni's trials and tribulations on Woody Allen's film set suggest Meryl Streep need not be losing any sleep quite yet. We're told – with maybe a hint of exaggeration – that it took France's First Lady a whopping 35 takes to convincingly exit a grocery store. Apparently the problem was caused by the fact "Madame Fancy Pants" couldn't stop staring at the camera! As the Daily Mail helpfully pointed out, it's not the first time she's tried to "monopolise" the lense. Apparently on a visit to London she shamelessly deployed all her "feline charm" in the direction of hapless snappers "licking her lips seductively" and offering a "husky 'bonjour'." (Glad I missed all that). Still, suggestions Bruni's take-tally could be one for the record books are wide of the mark. According to film historians, that honour still goes to one Shelley Duvall, who was obliged to perform 127 takes of the infamous" baseball-bat" scene with Jack Nicholson in The Shining before director Stanley Kubrick was satisfied. Still time Carla.

Designer dens: Regal sells homes for £12m each

Regal Homes has sold two of its exclusive mansions in north London to overseas buyers for around £12m each, writes Margareta Pagano.

PCC rejects Heather Mills complaint

A complaint by Heather Mills that claims that Piers Morgan had introduced her to ex-husband Sir Paul McCartney were inaccurate has been rejected by the Press Complaints Commission (PCC).

Isle of Wight Photo Galllery 2010

Pink's crazy acrobatics, Florence's fantastic performance and phenomenal appearances by Paul McCartney, Jay-Z and Spandau Ballet made this year's Isle of Wight festival one to remember...

Nanny loses unfair sacking claim against Heather Mills

Heather Mills's former nanny has lost her claim of sexual discrimination and constructive dismissal against her, her solicitor said today.

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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Israel-Gaza conflict: No victory for Israel despite weeks of death and devastation

Robert Fisk: No victory for Israel despite weeks of devastation

Palestinians have won: they are still in Gaza, and Hamas is still there
Mary Beard writes character reference for Twitter troll who called her a 'slut'

Unlikely friends: Mary Beard and the troll who called her a ‘filthy old slut’

The Cambridge University classicist even wrote the student a character reference
America’s new apartheid: Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone

America’s new apartheid

Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone
Amazon is buying Twitch for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?

What is the appeal of Twitch?

Amazon is buying the video-game-themed online streaming site for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?
Tip-tapping typewriters, ripe pongs and slides in the office: Bosses are inventing surprising ways of making us work harder

How bosses are making us work harder

As it is revealed that one newspaper office pumps out the sound of typewriters to increase productivity, Gillian Orr explores the other devices designed to motivate staff
Manufacturers are struggling to keep up with the resurgence in vinyl records

Hard pressed: Resurgence in vinyl records

As the resurgence in vinyl records continues, manufacturers and their outdated machinery are struggling to keep up with the demand
Tony Jordan: 'I turned down the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series nine times ... then I found a kindred spirit'

A tale of two writers

Offered the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series, Tony Jordan turned it down. Nine times. The man behind EastEnders and Life on Mars didn’t feel right for the job. Finally, he gave in - and found an unexpected kindred spirit
Could a later start to the school day be the most useful educational reform of all?

Should pupils get a lie in?

Doctors want a later start to the school day so that pupils can sleep later. Not because teenagers are lazy, explains Simon Usborne - it's all down to their circadian rhythms
Prepare for Jewish jokes – as Jewish comedians get their own festival

Prepare for Jewish jokes...

... as Jewish comedians get their own festival
SJ Watson: 'I still can't quite believe that Before I Go to Sleep started in my head'

A dream come true for SJ Watson

Watson was working part time in the NHS when his debut novel, Before I Go to Sleep, became a bestseller. Now it's a Hollywood movie, too. Here he recalls the whirlwind journey from children’s ward to A-list film set
10 best cycling bags for commuters

10 best cycling bags for commuters

Gear up for next week’s National Cycle to Work day with one of these practical backpacks and messenger bags
Paul Scholes: Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United

Paul Scholes column

Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United
Kate Bush, Hammersmith Apollo music review: A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it

Kate Bush shows a voice untroubled by time

A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it
Robot sheepdog technology could be used to save people from burning buildings

The science of herding is cracked

Mathematical model would allow robots to be programmed to control crowds and save people from burning buildings
Tyrant: Is the world ready for a Middle Eastern 'Dallas'?

This tyrant doesn’t rule

It’s billed as a Middle Eastern ‘Dallas’, so why does Fox’s new drama have a white British star?