Sport Chris Chataway was the first winner of the BBC’s Sports Personality of the Year in 1954

Murray may well be named BBC Sports Personality of the Year tonight, but he won’t be there

Scientists face 'shocking levels' of vilification over discoveries

Scientists are being subjected to shocking levels of personal vilification and distrust, Britain's most senior scientist has warned.

Paul Smith looks sharp as profits rise 18 per cent to £21m

The upmarket fashion retailer Paul Smith said it defied the economic downturn to deliver a sharp rise in annual profits, driven by a strong performance in Britain and overseas. The company, founded by the legendary Nottingham-born designer Sir Paul Smith, also increased its turnover, despite wholesale orders slipping.

Paul McCartney, Academy, Liverpool

Paul McCartney's 35-song set is just brilliant... and the guitar's holding up too

100 Club gets a little help from a friend

It takes a worthy cause to get an old Beatle on such a small stage.

Sir Paul McCartney to play gig at threatened club

Sir Paul McCartney is to play his smallest show for more than a decade - with a gig for just 300 people at threatened punk venue the 100 Club.

My Secret Life: Lucy Porter, comedian, 37

My parents were ... Maurice and Rita. They were, and are, the best in the world. I have no complaints about the genes I've inherited, even the ones that make me short and prone to ear infections.

FAB: An Intimate Life of Paul McCartney by Howard Sounes

Reading this book, listening to his post-Beatles music, it's hard to disagree with David Puttnam – that Paul McCartney is a man of "immense, immense, immense talent" unable to make the crucial extra effort that would transform the merely good into the exceptional. "Was it that it was too hard, was it that it was too challenging? Or was it that he was a reasonably contented guy and he didn't think it was worth putting himself through that amount of pain? But the difference between good and great is that last 15 per cent." Puttnam believes he has not "absolutely delivered what was in [him]".

Brian Clarke

In last Saturday's article, 'We had a private conversation. I was moved by his modesty', we described Brian Clarke's meeting with the Pope and the item was labelled 'First Person'. We should have made clear it was based on an interview given by Brian Clarke to our journalist rather than being written by Brian Clarke himself. Brian Clarke did not introduce the names of Paul McCartney or Francis Bacon but merely responded to questions put to him by the journalist. We are happy to make this clear.

Diary: Bell rings well for Paul

Having ably steered the Paul McCartney publicity machine in recent years, there's little sign of the former Beatle's media man Stuart Bell putting a foot wrong. With Sir Paul having parted company with his last long-term PR lackey, Geoff Baker, back in 2004 following a fall-out, Bell has proved a valuable ally – credited, not least, with ensuring that the songwriter emerged smelling of roses after his divorce from the helpfully bonkers Heather Mills. Perhaps not surprisingly, Bell's occasional online column about life with Saint Macca, charmingly entitled For Whom The Bell Tells, is never in danger of going off-message. "Here in the newsroom we've now read literally thousands of amazing live reviews of our man and his band and we're convinced that no other artist in the world receives such mind-boggling write-ups," we're informed. "It's simply unprecedented," he adds. With McCartney now reportedly due to make an inevitably cringeworthy cameo on the hip young drama Glee, dare Bell tell his elderly client it's a rubbish idea?

Fiona Reynolds: 'In difficult times, simple pleasures are important'

An ever-expanding National Trust is playing a crucial role in people's lives, its director general, Fiona Reynolds, tells Andy McSmith

Diary: 'Take 35' for film star Carla

Gleeful reports in the British press this week regarding Carla Bruni's trials and tribulations on Woody Allen's film set suggest Meryl Streep need not be losing any sleep quite yet. We're told – with maybe a hint of exaggeration – that it took France's First Lady a whopping 35 takes to convincingly exit a grocery store. Apparently the problem was caused by the fact "Madame Fancy Pants" couldn't stop staring at the camera! As the Daily Mail helpfully pointed out, it's not the first time she's tried to "monopolise" the lense. Apparently on a visit to London she shamelessly deployed all her "feline charm" in the direction of hapless snappers "licking her lips seductively" and offering a "husky 'bonjour'." (Glad I missed all that). Still, suggestions Bruni's take-tally could be one for the record books are wide of the mark. According to film historians, that honour still goes to one Shelley Duvall, who was obliged to perform 127 takes of the infamous" baseball-bat" scene with Jack Nicholson in The Shining before director Stanley Kubrick was satisfied. Still time Carla.

Designer dens: Regal sells homes for £12m each

Regal Homes has sold two of its exclusive mansions in north London to overseas buyers for around £12m each, writes Margareta Pagano.

PCC rejects Heather Mills complaint

A complaint by Heather Mills that claims that Piers Morgan had introduced her to ex-husband Sir Paul McCartney were inaccurate has been rejected by the Press Complaints Commission (PCC).

Isle of Wight Photo Galllery 2010

Pink's crazy acrobatics, Florence's fantastic performance and phenomenal appearances by Paul McCartney, Jay-Z and Spandau Ballet made this year's Isle of Wight festival one to remember...

Nanny loses unfair sacking claim against Heather Mills

Heather Mills's former nanny has lost her claim of sexual discrimination and constructive dismissal against her, her solicitor said today.

Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
The Silk Roads that trace civilisation: Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places

The Silk Roads that trace civilisation

Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places
House of Lords: Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled

The honours that shame Britain

Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled
When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race

'When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race'

Why are black men living the stereotypes and why are we letting them get away with it?
International Tap Festival: Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic

International Tap Festival comes to the UK

Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic
War with Isis: Is Turkey's buffer zone in Syria a matter of self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

Turkey's buffer zone in Syria: self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

Ankara accused of exacerbating racial division by allowing Turkmen minority to cross the border
Doris Lessing: Acclaimed novelist was kept under MI5 observation for 18 years, newly released papers show

'A subversive brothel keeper and Communist'

Acclaimed novelist Doris Lessing was kept under MI5 observation for 18 years, newly released papers show
Big Blue Live: BBC's Springwatch offshoot swaps back gardens for California's Monterey Bay

BBC heads to the Californian coast

The Big Blue Live crew is preparing for the first of three episodes on Sunday night, filming from boats, planes and an aquarium studio
Austin Bidwell: The Victorian fraudster who shook the Bank of England with the most daring forgery the world had known

Victorian fraudster who shook the Bank of England

Conman Austin Bidwell. was a heartless cad who carried out the most daring forgery the world had known
Car hacking scandal: Security designed to stop thieves hot-wiring almost every modern motor has been cracked

Car hacking scandal

Security designed to stop thieves hot-wiring almost every modern motor has been cracked
10 best placemats

Take your seat: 10 best placemats

Protect your table and dine in style with a bold new accessory
Ashes 2015: Alastair Cook not the only one to be caught in The Oval mindwarp

Cook not the only one to be caught in The Oval mindwarp

Aussie skipper Michael Clarke was lured into believing that what we witnessed at Edgbaston and Trent Bridge would continue in London, says Kevin Garside
Can Rafael Benitez get the best out of Gareth Bale at Real Madrid?

Can Benitez get the best out of Bale?

Back at the club he watched as a boy, the pressure is on Benitez to find a winning blend from Real's multiple talents. As La Liga begins, Pete Jenson asks if it will be enough to stop Barcelona
Athletics World Championships 2015: Beijing witnesses new stage in the Jessica Ennis-Hill and Katarina Johnson-Thompson heptathlon rivalry

Beijing witnesses new stage in the Jess and Kat rivalry

The last time the two British heptathletes competed, Ennis-Hill was on the way to Olympic gold and Johnson-Thompson was just a promising teenager. But a lot has happened in the following three years
Jeremy Corbyn: Joining a shrewd operator desperate for power as he visits the North East

Jeremy Corbyn interview: A shrewd operator desperate for power

His radical anti-austerity agenda has caught the imagination of the left and politically disaffected and set a staid Labour leadership election alight
Isis executes Palmyra antiquities chief: Defender of ancient city's past was killed for protecting its future

Isis executes Palmyra antiquities chief

Robert Fisk on the defender of the ancient city's past who was killed for protecting its future