News A 1999 photograph of Jimmy Savile

A report by children's charity the NSPCC revealed the extent of Savile's offending over several decades

Amol Rajan: Love really is all you need so, go on, buy those roses

Everybody knows that Valentine's Day is a giant orgy of commercial exploitation and a cynical distraction from our romantic failures over the rest of the year. It's traumatic for those people not in relationships, and hypocritical for those people in them, who pretend they fancy their partners when what they're really thinking about in bed is the company secretary.

News Corp - As the phone-hacking scandal escalated, News Corp’s chairman Rupert Murdoch (pictured with his wife Wendi Deng) set up the Management & Standards Committee as a way of showing good corporate governance and
giving his British newspapers a clean bill of health. Its findings have contributed to one title being closed and another now stands on the brink

Now The Sun tries to call in its favours from Downing Street

No 10 rebuffs newspaper as journalist claims they are being treated like 'an organised crime gang'

ANDREW LANSLEY: Senior Tories were deployed on TV shows to shore up the Health Secretary’s position

Coalition cracks show as senior Lib Dem calls for Lansley to quit

Party's deputy leader breaks ranks over health Bill despite Cameron's public show of support

Ian Burrell: How far will Rupert Murdoch go to save the Currant Bun?

Is this the end of The Sun? Rupert Murdoch is reportedly flying to the UK, ostensibly to save a newspaper he has loved since he bought it in 1969 from being engulfed by an unprecedented police bribery scandal.

Rupert Murdoch has pledged that he will not sell The Sun, which he bought in 1969

Eight arrests as Murdoch 'throws staff to the wolves'

Five senior 'Sun' journalists, two MoD staff and a police officer taken in dawn swoop as new front opens in bribery scandal

Between The Covers: 'Hatchet Job of the Year Award' and the London Super Comic Convention

The inaugural "Hatchet Job of the Year Award" was won by Adam Mars-Jones last Tuesday evening at a packed ceremony at the Coach & Horses in Greek Street, Soho, famous as the former home of Norman Balon, "the rudest landlord in London".

Invisible Ink: No 110 - Peter Dickinson

Are books dumbing down? Peter Dickinson's work hasn't.

Monster success: Michael Acton Smith and friend hope to expand into South America

The children's game-cum-social network Moshi Monsters is set to tap investors to fund an expansion into Spanish-speaking countries.

The Saturday Quiz

1. A conscientious objector, which leading British artist spent his National Service years (1957-59) working as a medical orderly?

Album: Alberteen, Metal Book (Rhythm & Noir)

Their name's sideways nod to The Slits' Viv Albertine is just one of a welter of new-wave influences coursing through Alberteen's Metal Book.

PCC director Stephen Abell to stand down

The director of the Press Complaints Commission (PCC) is standing down at the end of this month.

Maycock: as well as reviewing, he worked to promote a wide range of music

Robert Maycock: Classical music critic for 'The Independent'

The music critic and sometime Music Editor of The Independent, Robert Maycock, who has died in a car accident, was among the most principled and independent-minded writers on classical and contemporary music of his generation. As a regular contributor to this newspaper since its inception, he wrote perceptively on music of many kinds. He also worked tirelessly to promote an unusually wide range of music and a reconsideration of the path that he considered new music should take.

Livingstone under fire for saying Tories 'riddled' with closet gays

Labour's candidate for London mayor was accused of being gay friendly only as a political ploy

Viv Groskop: Page 3 is a fossil from a bygone era

Mohan says it's a 'matter of taste'. Come on, love, what are you complaining about?
Bemused: David Miliband

Diary: Rumours of Miliband plot prove exaggerated

David Miliband made massive waves with that article in the New Statesman that contained the memorable warning against the "seductive" idea that Labour can win an election by reverting to a 1980s mindset. "It is what I shall call Reassurance Labour," he wrote. "Reassurance about our purpose, our relevance, our position, even our morals. Reassurance Labour feels good. But feeling good is not the same as doing good.... Now is a time for restless rethinking, not reassurance."

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Minoan Crete and Santorini
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'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Russell Brand's interview with Ed Miliband has got everyone talking about The Trews

Everyone is talking about The Trews

Russell Brand's 'true news' videos attract millions of viewers. But today's 'Milibrand' interview introduced his resolutely amateurish style to a whole new crowd
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before
'Queer saint' Peter Watson left his mark on British culture by bankrolling artworld giants

'Queer saint' who bankrolled artworld giants

British culture owes a huge debt to Peter Watson, says Michael Prodger
Pushkin Prizes: Unusual exchange programme aims to bring countries together through culture

Pushkin Prizes brings countries together

Ten Scottish schoolchildren and their Russian peers attended a creative writing workshop in the Highlands this week
14 best kids' hoodies

14 best kids' hoodies

Don't get caught out by that wind on the beach. Zip them up in a lightweight top to see them through summer to autumn
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The acceptable face of the Emirates

The acceptable face of the Emirates

Has Abu Dhabi found a way to blend petrodollars with principles, asks Robert Fisk