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Labour backbencher Marsha Singh is to step down as an MP, triggering a by-election in his Bradford West constituency.

Letter: Labour hopefuls have own minds

Sir: We write having read your survey of Labour prospective parliamentary candidates (30 September).

Revenge of an odd couple

Mary Braid looks into the eccentric world of Labour's giant-killers

Labour faces court over election expenses

A court case could decide the legality of indirect spending to promote election candidates, after the Crown Prosecution Service yesterday confirmed that it had passed on to police a complaint about a special edition of the Daily Mirror which was distributed free in the Littleborough and Saddleworth by-election, writes John Rentoul.

Fabian uproar as research chief says: 'bring back selection in schools'

THE Fabians have fallen out. Labour's own think-tank, founded 110 years ago by George Bernard Shaw and Sidney and Beatrice Webb, has been locked in heady conflict over Labour's last great sacred cow: education.

Mawhinney spurns Labour TV challenge

JOHN RENTOUL

Parties contest meaning of victory

John Rentoul assesses the aftermath of Thursday's by-election and finds the vote has bred further squabbling

Lib Dems defy Labour surge in by-election

Tories' Commons majority down to single figures

Labour claims playing to win gave party a moral victory

Littleborough & Saddleworth: Liberal Democrats defy national political gravity

Undecided keep parties guessing to the end

By-election: Labour hopes for late swing to overhaul Liberal Democrats. John Rentoul reports

Ashdown 'to fight on as Lib Dem leader'

Paddy Ashdown's leadership of the Liberal Democrats was at the centre of speculation yesterday as his party traded insults over dirty tricks in the Littleborough and Saddleworth by-election.

Blair's local hero takes cue in Pennine poll drama

Paul Routledge on Labour's hopes of a box-office hit in Littleborough

Labour launches twin attacks in Littleborough

Former Tories and tactical voters are targeted, writes John Rentoul reports

New parties, old politics

When New Labour's leader, Tony Blair, talks of the new politics grown columnists swoon, blind men throw off their crutches and tough women weep. His earnest promises of honesty, openness, fair debate and pluralism sound like the most attractive aspects of the old SDP, except now linked to the chance of power. Paddy Ashdown too always gives the impression that he understands the popular desire for a less confrontational, less tribal political discourse.

Lib Dems find attack the best form of defence

'Someone has changed tactics and pressed the panic button'

Narrow poll lead for the Lib Dems

Tactical voting holds key to by-election outcome
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

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It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

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New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

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Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

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'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

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This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

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Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

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Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

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