Life and Style

Former bodybuilding champion Jim Morris still has an amazing physique, which he credits to his veganism

TV and sports idols being used to sell steroid-producing tablets

STARS OF the Gladiators television series and the American football player Joe Theismann are among sports stars being used to promote a new wave of tablets and food replacements claimed to boost muscle development without breaking rules on steroids.

X-treme; What's my definition?

With the honourable exception of snooker, Britain cannot claim to lead the world in too many sporting pursuits. One of the few in which it does reign supreme (and which is, arguably, even more dynamic than snooker) is body building.

The Life Doctor Eleanor Bailey

A HUNDRED years ago, if you wanted to sort your life out you hired a servant and told them what to do. For some masochistic reason it doesn't work like that anymore. Now we hire someone to tell us how to do the work. First it was personal trainers, then life coaches. Now I am meeting a "lifestyle manager". Joanna Hall will analyse everything I eat, the exercise I do, my energy levels, my stress and my sleep and then explain why I feel so rough.

Food for thought What is a meat analogue?

ALTHOUGH THEY sound pretty space-age, meat analogues are simply the substance behind Linda-burgers and other such meat-free foods. For those who do not consume meat and obtain all their protein from other sources, meat analogues are indispensable. They mimic the sensory qualities of meat, for example its flavour and texture. Two popular MOs are textured vegetable protein (TVP), aka soya mince, and myco-protein, aka Quorn. Two others, both soya-based, are tofu, made from soya "milk", and tempeh, a solid, flat, cake-like substance made from fermented soya beans.

A hum of life where once was despair

IT IS so different now. The Bararud feeding centre in the heart of Bahr el Gazal hums with conversation, and the high protein mix for children is doled out in orange mugs with ordered efficiency. There has been time to lay concrete flooring with numbered spaces for the mothers. The children are given medical checks, vitamins and measles jabs.

Food for thought: Are prawns really pink?

In the US they're called "shrimp", in India "prawn" and in the UK they're named according to size. However, no matter what you call them, one fact remains: they only go pink when boiled.

Cream treatment for epilepsy

TWO YOUNG brothers have been promised as much cream as they can eat after doctors suggested that it might help their epilepsy.

Food for thought: Why do bad eggs smell?

There are many simple tests to check whether or not an egg is fresh - for example, if it sinks in water then it is usually okay. But the only sure-fire test is to crack it open and take a sniff. Does the bouquet remind you of your old school football socks? If so, it's definitely rotten.

Go Higher: The joys of home cooking

IF YOU'VE never had to cook for yourself before, the prospect of preparing all your own meals can seem daunting, but it can also be fun and give you the satisfaction of realising you can survive.

Richard Ehrlich's beverage report: T is for tastings, tannin, and tears

The marathon, even superhuman, efforts it takes to bring you this column - revealed

Health: Poison on our plates

The man blew the whistle on BSE has written a truly frightening book.

Open Eye: On the track of the fatal protein Research into Alzheimer's and CJD has earned a rare distinction. Yvonne Cook reports

Bound in two volumes between plain black covers is Dr Harry Baker's life's work. It looks unspectacular - but the research it contains has just won him the rare honour of a DSc (Doctor of Science) degree from the Open University - the first OU graduate ever to receive this distinction.

Dilemma over telling CJD victims

THE GOVERNMENT faces an ethical dilemma after deciding to fund anonymous tests of tonsils and appendixes removed from thousands of patients, to see whether they are incubating the deadly "new variant" Creutzfeldt- Jakob Disease (v-CJD).

Scientist develops supertest for CJD

THE GOVERNMENT is funding development of a test for CJD which could detect the presence of just a few hundred infectious molecules in a drop of blood.

Scorn poured on genetic risk claim

CLAIMS THAT a strain of experimental genetically-modified (GM) potatoes might harm humans were shot down yesterday, as scientists pointed out that the potatoes would fail existing regulatory tests for modified foods.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape
eBay's enduring appeal: Online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce retailer

eBay's enduring appeal

The online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce site
Culture Minister Ed Vaizey: ‘lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird’

'Lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird'

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey calls for immediate action to address the problem
Artist Olafur Eliasson's latest large-scale works are inspired by the paintings of JMW Turner

Magic circles: Artist Olafur Eliasson

Eliasson's works will go alongside a new exhibition of JMW Turner at Tate Britain. He tells Jay Merrick why the paintings of his hero are ripe for reinvention
Josephine Dickinson: 'A cochlear implant helped me to discover a new world of sound'

Josephine Dickinson: 'How I discovered a new world of sound'

After going deaf as a child, musician and poet Josephine Dickinson made do with a hearing aid for five decades. Then she had a cochlear implant - and everything changed
Greggs Google fail: Was the bakery's response to its logo mishap a stroke of marketing genius?

Greggs gives lesson in crisis management

After a mishap with their logo, high street staple Greggs went viral this week. But, as Simon Usborne discovers, their social media response was anything but half baked
Matthew McConaughey has been singing the praises of bumbags (shame he doesn't know how to wear one)

Matthew McConaughey sings the praises of bumbags

Shame he doesn't know how to wear one. Harriet Walker explains the dos and don'ts of fanny packs
7 best quadcopters and drones

Flying fun: 7 best quadcopters and drones

From state of the art devices with stabilised cameras to mini gadgets that can soar around the home, we take some flying objects for a spin
Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

The midfielder returned to the Premier League after two years last weekend. The controversial character had much to discuss after his first game back
Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

British No 1 knows his consistency as well as his fitness needs working on as he prepares for the US Open after a ‘very, very up and down’ year
Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home