Steve Richards: The roads to reform are paved with good intentions

There is less in these market-based reforms than meets the eye. They are not the all-embracing, coherent, efficent solution that the evangelists suggest

Union boss predicts strike victory

England 195-4 v Sri Lanka 184

Cuts to foreign students 'will cost Britain billions'

Government plans to cut the number of foreign students at universities and colleges will cost far more than they will save, according to the Home Office's own estimates.

Foreign students cut could cost economy £2.4bn

Home Secretary Theresa May's plans to cut the number of foreign students coming to Britain will cost the economy £2.4 billion, figures have showed.

Public sector staff are 'set to strike'

More than a million public sector workers are set to take strike action in the autumn unless the Government pulls back from its controversial pension changes, a union leader warned today.

Stephen King: A week when you finish up clutching a pair of scissors

Economic outlook: In 2006 UK public spending was about 41 per cent of GDP. Last year it had jumped to 47.5 per cent

Councils offered cash to keep weekly bin collections

Weekly bin collections, one of the public services most highly prized by Conservative voters, are to be rescued from the impact of public spending cuts.

Leading article: Communities need money not gimmicks

When politicians need an eye-catching initiative they end up heading for the hole in the wall. Tony Blair came up with the idea of getting the police to march yobs to cash machines to pay on-the-spot fines. And now the Coalition is recommending that the public be given the option of making charitable donations whenever they use a cash machine. The idea is likely to be included in a White Paper today, along with other suggestions, such as rounding up customers' bills in restaurants to the nearest pound and channelling the extra pennies to worthy causes.

Volunteers boost Government internet campaign

A Government-sponsored campaign to get more people using the internet claimed today to have recruited the country's biggest ever cross-sector volunteer force.

John McDonnell: Taking to the streets may get the Government to listen

The dictat to the police after the attack on Milbank was clearly to do whatever is necessary to prevent this from happening again

Laurie Penny: Fight for your right to be heard

A concerted campaign is under way in the tame tabloid press to portray UKUncut and other peaceful protesters as thuggish and alien

Unison leaders warn of strikes

Union leaders have warned of industrial action "on an industrial scale" against the Government's plans to slash public-sector spending.

Warning over industrial turmoil

The Government was today warned it faces industrial turmoil on a "massive scale" as unions start planning to step up opposition to spending and job cuts.

Yes camp rules out use of costly counting machines

The Liberal Democrats and Labour joined forces yesterday to issue a cast-iron pledge that a switch to the alternative vote (AV) would never require the use of electronic vote counting machines.

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No postcode? No vote

Floating voters

How living on a houseboat meant I didn't officially 'exist'
Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin

By Reason of Insanity

Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin
Power dressing is back – but no shoulderpads!

Power dressing is back

But banish all thoughts of Eighties shoulderpads
Spanish stone-age cave paintings 'under threat' after being re-opened to the public

Spanish stone-age cave paintings in Altamira 'under threat'

Caves were re-opened to the public
'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'

Vince Cable interview

'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'
Election 2015: How many of the Government's coalition agreement promises have been kept?

Promises, promises

But how many coalition agreement pledges have been kept?
The Gaza fisherman who built his own reef - and was shot dead there by an Israeli gunboat

The death of a Gaza fisherman

He built his own reef, and was fatally shot there by an Israeli gunboat
Saudi Arabia's airstrikes in Yemen are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Saudi airstrikes are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Arab intervention in Yemen risks entrenching Sunni-Shia divide and handing a victory to Isis, says Patrick Cockburn
Zayn Malik's departure from One Direction shows the perils of fame in the age of social media

The only direction Zayn could go

We wince at the anguish of One Direction's fans, but Malik's departure shows the perils of fame in the age of social media
Young Magician of the Year 2015: Meet the schoolgirl from Newcastle who has her heart set on being the competition's first female winner

Spells like teen spirit

A 16-year-old from Newcastle has set her heart on being the first female to win Young Magician of the Year. Jonathan Owen meets her
Jonathan Anderson: If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

British designer Jonathan Anderson is putting his stamp on venerable house Loewe
Number plates scheme could provide a licence to offend in the land of the free

Licence to offend in the land of the free

Cash-strapped states have hit on a way of making money out of drivers that may be in collision with the First Amendment, says Rupert Cornwell
From farm to fork: Meet the Cornish fishermen, vegetable-growers and butchers causing a stir in London's top restaurants

From farm to fork in Cornwall

One man is bringing together Cornwall's most accomplished growers, fishermen and butchers with London's best chefs to put the finest, freshest produce on the plates of some of the country’s best restaurants
Robert Parker interview: The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes

Robert Parker interview

The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes
Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

We exaggerate regional traits and turn them into jokes - and those on the receiving end are in on it too, says DJ Taylor