Vaizey to review games tax relief

The body representing the UK's video-games industry has vowed to fight on for a tax break as Ed Vaizey, the minister for culture, committed to reviewing its proposals.

That Face, Crucible Studio, Sheffield

The stained and scratched old family photo on the poster for Polly Stenham's That Face suggests a different story to the one which unfolds so compellingly on the stage of the Crucible Studio. Dad looks proud, even smug, while Mum (Martha) seems content enough. Daughter Mia conveys a bubbly personality and only son Henry looks serious. There's no sign of the word "dysfunctional" stamped across the image. But it's there, all right, etched into the snapshot from behind whose golden frame emerges a quite different story, packed with complexity, richness and quirkiness. By the time we encounter this family, money-man Dad has abandoned his sozzled wife and his kids for a new start in Hong Kong. Henry has given up school to become his drug-dependent mother's carer while Mia is threatened with expulsion for some coolly savage behaviour in the dormitory.

Tom Sutcliffe: Private lives in a public muddle

The Week In Culture

Games industry praises budget tax cuts

Chancellor Alastair Darling's Budget announcement of tax relief for the UK videogames industry is being hailed a "decisive breakthrough" by a group which has long lobbied for the move.

20:50 Richard Wilson, Saatchi Gallery, London

Another fine and sumptuous mess

Last Night's Television - Electric Dreams, BBC4; Two Feet in the Grave, BBC1

Matters of life and death

Games industry lobbies UK MPs for tax relief

Proposed tax relief for the development of videogames would create 1,400 new jobs and be the catalyst for multi-million investment by British studios, it has been claimed.

Hillary's family sue over papers

The children of Sir Edmund Hillary are going to court to keep control of their father's writings, old diaries and thousands of family photographs bequeathed to the Auckland Museum in his will.

Age of virtue: New books hold out the hope of a kinder, juster society

Boyd Tonkin samples the New Compassion – and discovers that it gives us a surprisingly easy ride

Howard Jacobson: God knows, we like a mirthster, but this smart-arsery is not funny

Laconic cynicism sounds like comedy – we laugh in obedient recognition

Pandora: Vaz-a-voom!

Poor old Tory squillionaire Lord Laidlaw, 65, was exposed by Sunday's News Of The World as a Viagra-chomping sex addict. The exposé is notable for three things: the first documented instance of the phrase "trilingual bisexual"; Laidlaw's stamina; and the fella's plan to give £1m of his £730m fortune to a relevant charity.

Let's hear it one more time for Biancaaaaah and Rickaaaay

It is the most eagerly awaited reunion since Pink Floyd took to the stage at Live8: Ricky and Bianca are coming back to Albert Square. But the EastEnders couple, played by Sid Owen and Patsy Palmer, say the decision to return to our screens was not easy. Some aspects of soap stardom can prove a lasting headache. "For me, it's like a swear word, the shouting of 'Rickaaaay!'," said Palmer last week. "Not a day has gone by in nine years when someone hasn't shouted that from cars and even up at my bedroom window at night. Even my daughter said it... making fun of me." According to Palmer, the scriptwriters haven't been kind, so when the pair appear again, cover your ears. "Biancaaaaah!"

You hum that theme tune, we'll exploit it ...

Cost-cutting in TV production companies isn't just affecting people's jobs – it may spell the end of the catchy theme tune. Chris Green meets one composer who is now fighting for his rights

Last Night's TV: I can't wait for one last bite of Nigella

Nigella Express, BBC2; David Renwick Night, BBC4

35 Degrees East, Linbury Studio Theatre, London <!-- none onestar twostar fourstar fivestar -->

At the height of the Cold War, Ninette de Valois, the founder of the Royal Ballet, set up a ballet company on Soviet Russia's doorstep. The Istanbul State Ballet Company and the Ankara State Ballet Company are the descendants of Valois's Turkish State Ballet, and they made their first visit to London as part of the Royal Ballet's anniversary.

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Mullah Omar, creator of the Taliban, is dead... for the fourth time

Mullah Omar, creator of the Taliban, is dead... again

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Margaret Attwood on climate change

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The cartoon hedgehog leading the way into a whole new reality

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Ants have unique ability to switch between individual and collective action, says study

Secrets of ants' teamwork revealed

The insects have an almost unique ability to switch between individual and collective action
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Donovan marks his 50th year in folk

The singer tells Nick Duerden about receiving death threats, why the world is 'mentally ill', and how he can write a song about anything, from ecology to crumpets
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Rory Buckeridge gets behind the wheel and explains how it works
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Twitter accused of 'Facebookisation'

Facebook exasperates its users by deciding which posts they can and can’t see. So why has Twitter announced plans to do the same?
Jane Birkin asks Hermès to rename bag - but what else could the fashion house call it?

Jane Birkin asks Hermès to rename bag

The star was shocked by a Peta investigation into the exotic skins trade
10 best waterproof mascaras

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We found lash-enhancing beauties that won’t budge no matter what you throw at them
Diego Costa biography: Chelsea striker's route to the top - from those who shared his journey

Diego Costa: I go to war. You come with me...

Chelsea's rampaging striker had to fight his way from a poor city in Brazil to life at the top of the Premier League. A new book speaks to those who shared his journey
Ashes 2015: England show the mettle to strike back hard in third Test

England show the mettle to strike back hard in third Test

The biggest problem facing them in Birmingham was the recovery of the zeitgeist that drained so quickly under the weight of Australian runs at Lord's, says Kevin Garside
Women's Open 2015: Charley Hull - 'I know I'm a good golfer but I'm also just a person'

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British teen keeps her feet on ground ahead of Women's Open
Turkey's conflict with Kurdish guerrillas in Iraq can benefit Isis in Syria

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Yvette Cooper: Our choice is years of Tory rule under Jeremy Corbyn or a return to a Labour government

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Yvette Cooper urged Labour members to 'get serious' about the next general election rather than become 'a protest movement'