Small Talk: World Cup fever gives Blinkx a chance to shine

The World Cup started on Friday, in case anyone missed it, and the national appetite for the competition has seen every consumer company attempt to jump on the band wagon rolling by. The subsequent deluge of advertising has ranged from the good (Nike and Puma) to the excruciating (pretty much all the others).

James waits in wings as Capello ponders options

Robert Green's private agonies were not spared in the deeper recesses of the Royal Bafokeng Stadium late on Saturday night. The plasma television screens that the players proceeded past out of the ground had a video of past World Cup goalkeeping bloopers on a loop. Green was spared an excruciating moment because the images, like the ball, eluded him, though the huge performance he put in after the match – he sought no excuses in his apology to the nation – suggests that he would have taken that footage on the chin.

Capello's gamble on King backfires

Defensive plans in tatters as Tottenham man faces early exit from tournament

James Lawton: England ask too much from Rooney bursts of brilliance

It's all very well saying that England have the man to beat the world in Wayne Rooney but no one can really do that, not on his own and not even Diego Maradona when you get right down to it.

Banks of England: He’s cost us the win but I’d stick with Rob Green

World Cup-winning legend pulls no punches: West Ham man looks the type who can recover... and don’t forget we also drew first game in 1966

Rob Green: 'I don't often miss ball by that much'

England's manager Fabio Capello was unexpectedly upbeat after last night's disappointing draw, insisting: "We played a good match and created lots of chances. I saw [for] another time the spirit of the team, fighting every time to win the ball. I am not worried about the physical condition for the next match this week because in the second half we ran better than the USA." Of Green's error, Capello said: "Sometimes keepers make mistakes. The ball moves a lot. In the second half Robert Green played very well. But the mistake remains a mistake."

True horror of history is narrowly avoided

When Joe Gaetjens deflected the most famous goal ever scored by an American, Alf Ramsey, who was England's right back in Belo Horizonte, would always recall the look of horror on the face of Bert Williams as the leather ball slid through his fingers.

England held by United States in World Cup

England 1 United States 1

Lampard vows to step up his game for final crack at glory

Frank Lampard has vowed to make his last World Cup one to remember for England and believes the vast experience in the squad could be a crucial factor in their bid for success.

England come through final training session

Fabio Capello gave a clean bill of health as his England squad went through their paces for the final time before they open their World Cup campaign against the United States tomorrow.

West Ham target Henry and Joe Cole

West Ham have not given up hope of bringing Joe Cole and Thierry Henry to the club, co-chairman David Gold has revealed.

Capello keeps his keepers guessing

James behind Hart and Green to start but decision will only be taken on match day

Rooney warned: keep your cool

Four-letter outburst would have earnt a red card in World Cup, says referee after England fail to impress against local side

Grant 'excited by challenge' as he takes over at West Ham

Upton Park in positive mood as new manager arrives, despite imminent clear-out of players

James joins outcry at 'dreadful' official balls

A World Cup or European Championship would not be the same without goalkeepers complaining about the new footballs being used. "Like a water polo ball, very goalkeeper-unfriendly," was Paul Robinson's verdict as England's No 1 in Germany four years ago. This time, however, there is another factor to contend with in the number of games being played at altitude and when David James, not a natural whinger, describes the new Adidas Jabulani ball, developed at Loughborough University, as "dreadful, horrible", he is not merely making excuses in advance for his embattled breed.

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