Welcome to the new Independent website. We hope you enjoy it and we value your feedback. Please contact us here.

Roger Daltrey

Diary: Nighy horses around

Another sorry tale of a frisky celebrity mounting something they shouldn't, I'm afraid. Bill Nighy, who has been in Cambridge since last month filming a new spy thriller, Page Eight, with Rachel Weisz and Ralph Fiennes, was reprimanded by the local authorities after engaging in a spot of illicit horseplay. Cambridge University's scurrilous student newspaper The Tab alleges that, during a break in filming, the mischievous star, 61, spotted a sculpture of a horse in the grounds of Jesus College and decided to try straddling it, with a crew member filming his antics for posterity. Before he could get his leg over, however, he was chastised by an irate college porter, and so scuttled sheepishly away.

Long live rock! The Who at the Super Bowl

Their generation? Bus-pass holders heading for the Zimmer. Yet tonight, resurgent in the US after five decades in the business, they play the Super Bowl. Barney Hoskyns salutes The Who

Beatles to Bowie: the 60s exposed, National Portrait Gallery, London

The Sixties? It was the decade when popular music in Britain threw off the shackles of America, became shaped and defined by photographic imagery as never before, and when the worlds of pop and fashion eagerly jumped into bed together. This comprehensive show at the National Portrait Gallery, which looks at Britpop year by year, gives us many of those defining images by Beaton, Bailey and others, and much else too – umpteen examples of the new pop and fashion magazines that flourished in that decade; sheet music; archival film of such pioneering TV shows as Ready, Steady, Go!; record covers, and all this to the accompaniment of the music of that decade.

Duffy and Paul Weller, Royal Albert Hall, London

The Dusty Springfield comparisons are a red herring. Duffy's material – apart from her perky, Martha Reeves-influenced single "Mercy" – reeks of that of a soft-rock chick in the Bonnie Tyler mould. The former Wawffactor (the Welsh equivalent of Pop Idol) contestant possesses a formidable screech, and tonight her brief seven-song set, all from her deliriously successful debut album Rockferry, slipped by unobjectionably. You could picture the 23-year warbler from Gwynedd going down a storm on cruise ships.