News Nicola Benedetti has criticised the state of music teaching in Britain

Acclaimed violinist criticises music teaching in the UK

Leading article: Seconds out at the Royal Albert Hall

If it seems to you that the mood of austerity and protest and cuts has a certain retro feel about it, your sense of déjà vu will only be reinforced by this ruling from the Court of Appeal yesterday. In overturning a lower court judgment that had upheld objections from local residents, the judges paved the way for boxing and wrestling to return to the Royal Albert Hall. They said that if the locals felt strongly, they could contest such events through the licensing procedures; it was not a matter for the courts.

Veuve Clicquot businesswoman of the year: the prize that comes before a fall?

Michelle McDowell has just been named Veuve Clicquot businesswoman of the year. Trouble is, for many of her predecessors it was a poisoned chalice

Roger Daltrey, Royal Albert Hall, London

If Tommy was made of bricks and mortar it would be Grade I listed by now. The tale of the deaf, dumb and blind kid with messianic tendencies is heritage rock, as safely establishment as the Albert Hall itself.

Roger Daltrey set to revive The Who's hit rock opera Tommy at Royal Albert Hall

Roger Daltrey is performing The Who's 1969 hit rock opera Tommy at the Royal Albert Hall next week, in aid of Teenage Cancer Trust.

Letter from the editor: 100 issues old today

Sam Roberts, with a six-word text, summed up the feelings of i readers up and down the country.

Madam Butterfly, Royal Albert Hall, London

Back by popular demand, David Freeman's staging for Raymond Gubbay of Puccini's tragedy of innocence, experience and colonialism has been adored nearly as much for its in-the-round design as its music. It takes place in a Japanese house ("a piece of origami," sings Pinkerton) amid a water garden on which candles float during the love duet; in the second half, when experience bites, the garden paved over. At the perimeter, impoverished locals wander by, occasionally stopping to pray at a Buddhist shrine, reminders of the culture our heroine tries to abandon for her feckless American bridegroom.

Philip Hensher: Shocking and disrespectful – but illegal?

Are the rights of mourning, commemoration, of general silence so compelling that no one may speak against them, and not raise a voice in protest

Cirque du Soleil, Royal Albert Hall, London

Despite a thrilling start and some stunning gymnastics, Cirque's loose study of evolution seems to be all science and no heart

Totem, Royal Albert Hall, London

The Royal Albert Hall proves to be an excellent substitute for a big top as it plays host to Cirque du Soleil's now-customary January visit to London. This time the French-Canadian entertainment giant has brought Totem, its second collaboration with the Québécois wunderkind Robert Lepage, one of the world's greatest theatre-makers.

Rufus Wainwright, Royal Albert Hall, London

Rufus Wainwright is the Jekyll and Hyde of the modern-day music scene – on one hand bursting with pleasantries, effusive and adorable in the extreme, on the other, dour, introspective, angry and indulgent.

The Cinematic Orchestra, Royal Albert Hall, London

It's been three years since The Cinematic Orchestra (TCO) last performed at the Royal Albert Hall. Then, a live album followed the adventurous electronic jazz outfit's acclaimed performance. Returning to celebrate the 20th birthday of their label, Ninja Tune, they again offered a transcendental soundtrack to imaginary movies that existed exclusively on wobbly reels in their fans' minds.

Album: Ludovico Einaudi, The Royal Albert Hall Concert< (Ponderosa Music & Art)

In his mingling of ambient, minimalist and cinematic strains, and his ear for a poignant melody, Ludovico Einaudi is the Italian equivalent of Michael Nyman, straddling classical, jazz, soundtrack and chillout.

Steve Miller, Royal Albert Hall, London

The Joker's still making them smile

Last Night: Last Night of the Proms, Royal Albert Hall, London

Fleming and the Proms bow out on a high note

Proms 72/73: BBCSO/Belohlavek; Penguin Cafe/Tickell, Royal Albert Hall (4/5, 4/5)

How should we listen to a complicated piece of new music? The premiere of Tansy Davies’s ‘Wild Card’ raised this simple-seeming question – to which the correct answer is not ‘let it wash over you’ – in a particularly pointed way.

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