Arts and Entertainment John Oliver has now landed his own show with the premier US network HBO

Birmingham-born comic will front satirical news programme on Sunday evenings

It was no joke for me, ambushed by Ali G

Richard D North was one of those humiliated on Ali G's show last weekend. Fair enough. But he has a bone to pick with his tormentor

Why do I squirm whenever Ali G is on the box?

I LOVE watching Ali G, the weird character who appears on Channel 4's The 11 O'Clock Show, the naughty, news-based programme that is fronted by two very clever and offensively young presenters.

Food allergies may be linked to autism

ALLERGIES MAY play a role in autism, a child health specialist said yesterday.

Television: The raw and the half-baked

Whatever has happened to Food and Drink (BBC2)? I stumbled across it last week, for the first time in a year or two, and I was shocked. It used to be an agreeably middlebrow, Middle-England sort of affair, amiably presented by Chris Kelly, a man any Rotary Club would be proud to call its own. There was also a little deft cookery by the chappie who invented Classic FM, and robust consideration of an issue or two.

Science: Why men become anoraks

Evolution may have programmed an autistic element into men's psyches which makes them prone to obsessive, train-spotterish behaviour.

A different way of thinking

Autism affects roughly one in 1,000 babies, most often boys. While around 75 per cent of autistic people also have some form of mental retardation, the syndrome itself does not involve retardation but characteristically features difficulties in communicating and relating to other people and what appears to be a quite different way of perceiving the world.

Got the evolution blues...

We are accustomed to attributing depression, anxiety and other mental disorders to faulty brain chemistry or childhood trauma. But there may be another explanation: the legacy of the apes.

SCIENCE / Unscrambling Synaesthesia

RICHARD Cytowic has spent a decade studying the history and causes of synaesthesia. At the core of his research is evidence that the brains of synaesthetes are organised differently from those of the rest of the population. But is this substantiated by other trials? Are other scientists even convinced that the condition exists?
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine