Arts and Entertainment

'Napoleon was a terrific guy before he started crossing national borders,' says Andrew Wylie

Obituary: Clarissa Luard

SHORTLY AFTER her first bout with cancer, in 1995 Clarissa Luard joined the Arts Council of England as a literature officer. Three days before her death, on 1 November she was promoted to senior literature officer.

Sunday success

SALES OF the Independent on Sunday are booming. The latest circulation figures released last week reveal that sales in October jumped by more than 16,000 to 267,762, a 6.7 per cent increase on the previous month and a rise of 3.6 per cent on the same period last year. The daily Independent also continued to grow, with October sales of 230,677, up 8,000 on the previous month and an increase of 3.4 per cent on last year.

Letter: The limits of protest

Sir: Did Yasmin Alibhai-Brown really mean to write, "Those people who burnt The Satanic Verses in Bradford were accused of censorship when what they were doing was expressing their rage at their own lack of any power in this country" ("Sex, politics and censorship", 9 September)?

Column One: With best wishes from Doris, Salman and Nick

JOHN LE CARRE couldn't make it, but Doris Lessing put in a rare appearance. Nick Hornby didn't show, but Salman Rushdie was there, although unannounced in the preview notices. Of J G Ballard there was no sign, but Kazuo Ishiguro stayed for lunch. Despite a handful of no-shows, the cream of British writers met their public in a London bookshop yesterday - all in the name of marketing.

How to give a book a cheeky title and get away with it

THERE IS an extraordinary trial going on at the High Court, in which the BBC is for the first time suing an author under the Trades Description Act for - for - well, it's hard to say what exactly. Perhaps an extract from yesterday's proceedings will make things clearer.

So, you don't like my book. That's OK. I'll have a tantrum

IT IS with the deepest regret that I have to report that certain scenes in today's column will not be suitable for family reading. Conscientious parents - the sort of caring people who will soon be security-tagging their children - may wish to tear out the TV page and keep the rest of this section on a high shelf. For the theme of the day is the paranoia and ego of writers.

Specials of the day

It's a tempting menu, but you can't have everything. So how do you decide what books to take on holiday? Blake Morrison offers some guidance

Books: Fine young cannibals: Kevin Sampson

At last, a novelist has got the rock scene right. Ben Thompson asks Kevin Sampson about moving from stage to page

Books: What it is to have 194 best friends

The Modern Library: The 200 Best Novels in English since 1950 by Carmen Callil and Colm Tibn Picador pounds 12.99

Music to his ears

First the fatwa, now a rock star: Salman Rushdie, U2's latest lyricist, explains himself in this week's `Arena'

Best Sellers: Hardbacks

1 The Whole Woman Germaine Greer/Doubleday pounds 16.99

Books: Underworld gossip

The Ground Beneath Her Feet

The Week in Radio: Accent U8 the positive

RADIO 4 ran a vivid report last month on the toxicity of caffeine - the pre-disposition of drinkers to heart disease, stroke, and so on. Just to see if it was possible, I cut out not just exotic coffee, but friendly old tea as well and, like Phillip Marlowe struck with a cosh, a black pool opened up beneath me and I dived in.

Radio: We're like pensioners at a wrestling match

A s it is Easter Sunday, I shall begin by examining the BBC's most popular religious programme - The Archers. (I shall leave it alone for the next few weeks, I promise, and as much for my sanity as yours.) Bear with me.

Pick of the Day: Radio

THE ACTOR David Suchet, currently starring as Salieri in Amadeus, talks about his musical Private Passions (12noon R3) and chooses a piano concerto by the maligned composer.
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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement