Arts and Entertainment

'Napoleon was a terrific guy before he started crossing national borders,' says Andrew Wylie

Books: Very good vibrations

`This is the Ulysses of rock'n'roll.' Ruth Padel comes back from the shaking showbiz underworld to hail a novel that really makes the earth move poetry anthologists to get over their and place

Words: 'n', conj.

LISA JARDINE is quoted in Prospect as being of the opinion that Shakespeare is "a pick `n' mix playwright". That this reduces him to the level of a cheap-candy stall in Woolworth's need not delay us (he has weathered worse, usually at the National), but it is instructive to compare this with a remark by Salman Rushdie in The New York Times: "Pick 'n' mix [is] at the heart of the modern, and hasn't it been that way for most of this all-shook-up century?"

Soundbites and slogans join great quotes of the age

THE SOUNDBITE has been acknowledged as equally important in the history of the 20th century as the seminal political speech or the utterances of the greatest scientists and inventors.

Leading Article: A time for cool heads

FOR GOVERNMENT policy to be decided in the midst of scandal and moral panic is not merely foolish, but irresponsible and dangerous. Legislate in haste, and the population will repent at leisure. The case of Stephen Lawrence was indeed appalling. The crime itself was horribly brutal, and the failure of the police to take effective action against the criminals afterwards grotesque. There is, as Geoffrey Robertson points out on this page, much good in the Macpherson report. Its recommendations on race policies, however, are often wrong-headed. The hyperbole from the right about "Thought Police" and "Orwellian nightmares" is predictable, but the fact is that some of the report's legislative proposals are excessive, ill-considered and dangerous. If implemented, they would represent an assault on liberal values.

Net Gains: Cronenberg's cronies

www.netlink.co.uk/users/zappa/cronen.html

Roll up for Rushdie and Seth prize-fight

SALMAN RUSHDIE and Vikram Seth are to be pitched against each other in the contest for this year's Booker Prize, in a continuation of the literary world's passionate affair with the Anglo-Indian novel.

A Week in Books: How Plato started the fatwa business

Dame Iris can account for Rushdie's plight

The Saturday Essay: A free imagination, or the tyranny of the mob?

Ten years on, Rushdie has shown us how literature is forgotten amid the hatred of art that haunts this century

The column: Failing the test

Howard Jacobson used to be bowled over by all things Australian but his love has just run out - and headgear has an unreasonable amount to do with it

That was the century that was

Friday Book: MODERN TIMES, MODERN PLACES BY PETER CONRAD, THAMES & HUDSON, pounds 24.95

Historical Notes: The Salman Rushdie of the Cold War

IF AMIDST the stock-taking at the century's end one man's life could take us through the age of extremes and personify the travails of millions, that man would be Arthur Koestler. As a writer he chronicled the century, as a man he lived it.

Police chief admits bias among officers to officers' prejudice

LLOYD CLARKE, Deputy Chief Constable of West Yorkshire, has joined the parade of high-ranking officers acknowledging institutional racism in their forces.

Cook relaunches ethical policy

ROBIN COOK relaunched his ethical foreign policy yesterday by announcing that Britain would campaign to eliminate torture throughout the world.

Jazz: Lyric Sheets

Recent revelations indicate that, at one time, the author Salman Rushdie hid from potential assassins in a gazebo in the grounds of Bono's clifftop villa near Dublin. The author's next book is reported to be about a rock group.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

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Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

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The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

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More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

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Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

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Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

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Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

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