Arts and Entertainment

'Napoleon was a terrific guy before he started crossing national borders,' says Andrew Wylie

No prizes for peace as Nobel judges fall out over literature shortlist

By Imre Karacs in Stockholm

My plight is as bad as Rushdie's if he had been living in Iran

IN HER FIRST interview since defiantly returning home last month, Taslima Nasreen, the controversial Bangladeshi feminist writer, told The Independent of her anguish as Islamic fundamentalists renewed their campaign to have her executed.

Theatre: haroun and the sea of stories

Yes, Salman Rushdie, you shall go to the ball. The best news of last week was that the author of Haroun and the Sea of Stories (above) would be able to attend the press night of the stage premiere of his novel without the need for a phalanx of bodyguards. The chances are that he will have enjoyed not only his freedom but the show itself as it has been adapted and directed by Tim Supple, whose versions of Grimm Tales and More Grimm Tales at the Young Vic have been so sensationally enjoyable.

First Night: Freed from shadow of the fatwa

Haroun and the Sea of Stories National Theatre London

A pawn in the battle for Iran

Rushdie's plight was never the point. The moderates had to oust the fundamentalists to make friends with the West

Essay: A victory for literary freedom

Iran's retreat on the Salman Rushdie fatwa is not the end of censorship, argues Ursula Owen

Spilling the beans, and human rites

A week is a long time in literature. At the beginning we had the Starr Report, a classic drama of adultery in high places, if ever there was one. Then, in London, came the announcement of the Booker Prize shortlist, an annual ritual that inspires a routine burst of light-hearted acrimony about the relative loftiness or small-mindedness (take your pick) of the so-called judges appointed to decide such matters.

WHO OWNS THE RUSHDIE FAMILY PILE?

ARVIND JAIN, pictured right, in front of the Delhi house which is the subject of a court battle with Salman Rushdie, regarding disputed ownership. Mr Rushdie is attempting to reclaim the property that his father once owned. Mr Jain is adamant he is entitled to stay, and is not going without a fight. "We are not going anywhere and are entirely confident of winning this case," he said.

Fatwa alive, say British Muslims

THE MUSLIM community in Great Britain was split yesterday between those still angered by Salman Rushdie's book The Satanic Verses and those who want to put the damaging affair behind them.

Books: How to thrill a thirtysomething

A Week in Books

Rushdie steps out as a free man

(if this is what you call freedom)

Secret talks that ended a 10-year ordeal

WHEN ROBIN Cook, the Foreign Secretary, landed in New York early yesterday, he was hopeful that Iran would end the threat to Salman Rushdie. And yet fears of a last-minute hitch still made his party nervous.

LITERALLY LOST: 43

COMPETITION

Literature: Riding an emotional rollercoaster

Ten years ago, when he was editing The Voice, Onyekachi Wambu (right) decided to mark the 40th anniversary of the arrival of 492 Jamaican immigrants at Tilbury Docks in the former troopship Empire Windrush. In conjunction with Lambeth Council and the South London Press, the paper published a booklet entitled Forty Winters, a riposte to a remark made by a journalist who interviewed the newcomers at the time, suggesting that they would all be gone after one winter. It received almost no attention.

Interview: Hanif Kureishi - Mid-life Kureishi

His writing has run the gamut from sex to tumble dryers and his new work has been praised for uncompromisingly laying life bare. But then, whose life is it anyway?
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Woman who was sent to three Nazi death camps describes how she escaped the gas chamber

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People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
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25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

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Smash hit go under the hammer

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A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
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Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea