Arts and Entertainment

Without question, the book that has most influenced my life has been Naked Lunch by William S Burroughs. I was astonished by the outrageous pot-head humour: crazy ideas taken way beyond their normal limits. The book was a savage indictment of American racism and consumerism, it dealt with the corruption, graft and lies of politicians with Swiftian humour. I had never read anything like, then or since.

juste a mot

A fortnightly update on new words, compiled in association with Chambers Dictionaries

ARTS : pick of the day

THE PLAY

Faust, furious and surprisingly funny

For many, Goethe's 'Faust' is about as 'high' as high art gets. But Howard Brenton, with a new translation for the RSC, celebrates its wicked sense of humour

BORIS PASTERNAK

HEROES & VILLAINS

A very angry young woman

Sick? Who are you calling sick? What's really sick is the reaction to my play, says Sarah Kane of Blasted.

Sad streets where life is a gas

the miracle shed Philip MacCann Faber £8.99

All lines of communication seem to have broken down

I have two television images stuck in my mind. I saw them at Christmas time and now, whenever my mind goes vacant, they float into view, like bath toys coming round from behind your back for the seventh time.

MUSIC / Old boys will be boys

London Sinfonietta - Barbican, London

BOOK REVIEW / Royalties for a naked lunch: 'The Good Ship Venus: The Erotic Voyage of the Olympia Press' - John de St Jorre: Hutchinson, 20 pounds

WHAT kind of man would publish titles like White Thighs, Bottoms Up, The Loins of Amon, The Whipping Club or Heaven, Hell and the Whore? Oddly enough, the kind of man who also published Samuel Beckett, Lawrence Durrell, Jean Genet, Henry Miller, Vladimir Nabokov and J P Donleavy.

BOOK REVIEW / Memory drowns the bureauprats: 'The Last Lesson of the Afternoon' - Christopher Rush: Canongate Press, 9.99 pounds: Jason Cowley on the long melancholy withdrawing roar of Christopher Rush's intimate and compelling new novel

READING the new novel by Christopher Rush is like stumbling on the open diary of a friend: each detail is compellingly personal, every event is irresistibly revealing. Written in a colloquial, garrulously splenetic first person, it has the charge and urgency of good autobiography, even though the story it tells amounts to little more than a stream of calamities and sorrows.

Glyndebourne stands by booed feminist opera

GLYNDEBOURNE yesterday defended the controversial production of Mozart's Don Giovanni, which received the loudest boos ever heard there.

BOOK REVIEW / Waiting for doodle: 'The Theatrical Notebooks of Samuel Beckett, Volume I: Waiting for Godot' - Ed Donald McMillan & James Knowlson: Faber, 75 pounds

ONCE upon a time he could not get his plays performed or his novels published; today Samuel Beckett's every doodle is jealously preserved in archives and by those individuals fortunate enough to own them. Even his production notes for the plays he himself directed are being eagerly published. Faber is planning volumes on Endgame, Krapp and the shorter plays, but has kicked off with the play that made Beckett famous, Waiting for Godot. The volume consists of a reconstructed text, based on the changes Beckett made for his 1975 Schiller-Theatre production and his 1984 San Quentin Drama Workshop production, plus a facsimile and transcription / translation of notebooks he kept while working on the German production, beautifully produced and with copious notes by the editors.

BEST-SELLERS / Top 10 Postcard Portraits

----------------------------------------------------------------- TOP 10 POSTCARD PORTRAITS ----------------------------------------------------------------- 1 . . Elizabeth I 2. . .Henry VIII 3. . .Bronte Sisters 4. . .Virginia Woolf 5. . .Shakespeare 6. . .Emily Bronte 7. . .Anne Boleyn 8. . .Ellen Terry 9. . .Richard III 10 . . Samuel Beckett ----------------------------------------------------------------- Chart supplied by the National Portrait Gallery (071-306 0055) -----------------------------------------------------------------

BOOK REVIEW / A raft of love goes sailing off: A second life - Dermot Bolger: Viking, pounds 15

LOST in a world of perpetual disintegration, Samuel Beckett's Unnameable aspired 'to start again from nowhere, from no one, and from nothing'. After lying clinically dead for a few seconds following a car crash, the narrator of A Second Life, a photographer called Sean Blake, wakes 'from nowhere,' to find himself in a position of comparable existential extremity.
Arts and Entertainment
The Doctor and the Dalek meet
tvReview: Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Arts and Entertainment
books
Sport
Diego Costa
footballEverton 3 Chelsea 6: Diego Costa double has manager purring
Life and Style
3D printed bump keys can access almost any lock
gadgets + techSoftware needs photo of lock and not much more
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Inside the gallery at Frederick Bremer School in Walthamstow
tvSimon Usborne goes behind the scenes to watch the latest series
Life and Style
Silvia says of her famous creation: 'I never stopped wearing it. Because I like to wear things when they are off the radar'
fashionThe fashion house celebrated fifteen years of the punchy pouch with a weighty tome
Arts and Entertainment
Gregg Wallace in Summer's Supermarket Secrets
tv All of this year's 15 contestants have now been named
News
i100Steve Carell selling chicken, Tina Fey selling saving accounts and Steve Colbert selling, um...
Life and Style
A picture taken on January 12, 2011 shows sex shops at the Paris district of Pigalle.
newsThe industry's trade body issued the moratorium on Friday
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Chosen to lead the women's wing of the ruling Zanu-PF, the wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding the 90-year old
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model of a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor
She's dark, sarcastic, and bashes life in Nowheresville ... so how did Kacey Musgraves become country music's hottest new star?

Kacey Musgraves: Nashville's hottest new star

The singer has two Grammys for her first album under her belt and her celebrity fans include Willie Nelson, Ryan Adams and Katy Perry
American soldier-poet Brian Turner reveals the enduring turmoil that inspired his memoir

Soldier-poet Brian Turner on his new memoir

James Kidd meets the prize-winning writer, whose new memoir takes him back to the bloody battles he fought in Iraq
Aston Villa vs Hull match preview: Villa were not surprised that Ron Vlaar was a World Cup star

Villa were not surprised that Vlaar was a World Cup star

Andi Weimann reveals just how good his Dutch teammate really is
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef ekes out his holiday in Italy with divine, simple salads

Bill Granger's simple Italian salads

Our chef presents his own version of Italian dishes, taking in the flavours and produce that inspired him while he was in the country
The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

If supporters begin to close bank accounts, switch broadband suppliers or shun satellite sales, their voices will be heard. It’s time for revolution