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Steve Hilton

The Battle of Boris Island

The fate of hundreds of thousands of migrating birds and the environment are hanging in the balance as the future of a possible airport on the Thames estuary is argued over by the London Mayor and the Prime Minister

A new return to Victorian values

Radical plans to make it easier for employers to sack their workers could soon become a reality. Yet they remain hugely controversial

Pay of PM's advisers is revealed (and one of them earns more than

David Cameron's chief spin doctor, Andy Coulson, is the highest-paid political adviser in the Government, earning more than Nick Clegg and only £2,500 less than the Prime Minister. The former News of the World editor, who was drafted in to run Mr Cameron's media strategy in 2007, receives £140,000 a year as director of communications at No 10, according to Cabinet Office figures unmasking the pay given to Whitehall's army of 61 special advisers.

The Coulson question continues to dog Cameron

David Cameron's team was described by one commentator as looking like the kitchen staff, but they seem likely to stick with him in Downing Street. They are highly trusted, and will remain low profile. They have been through a lot, but all are devoted followers of their leader, and relations in his office are nothing if not cheery.

So, David Cameron, why did you fail to seal the deal?

You started out against the most unpopular PM of recent times. The Lib Dems were running at less than 20 per cent in the opinion polls. The right-wing press was uniformly behind you and you had a double-digit lead for most of the four years you have led your party

As the hopes of a majority died, the feelers went out

David Cameron sat down in the Thatcher Room on the third floor of the Millbank Tower at 3.45pm yesterday and made the most important telephone call of his political life. It was to Nick Clegg, the Liberal Democrat leader, and it was to offer him a coalition that Mr Cameron hoped could put both men in power for the next five years.

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