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Marks & Spencer has joined retailers trying to lure shoppers on to the high street before Christmas with plans for a flash sale across its stores tomorrow.

Jeremy Warner's Outlook: Rose defends a grim update from M&S

Sir Stuart Rose, the newly knighted chief executive of Marks & Spencer, was uncharacteristically tetchy and defensive during his press call yesterday to announce the retailing giant's trading update. Who wouldn't have been after the jaw-dropping 20 per cent collapse in the share price that greeted the news of a 2.2 per cent fall in UK like-for-like sales?

Ellis Cashmore: Sticks and stones

Name-calling by DJ Chris Moyles and David Cameron heralds a revival of white male arrogance

Dom Joly: How I became a high-flying assassin

To the Maldives for a week's scuba diving with Stacey. I love starting a column with the words "To somewhere..." as it sounds very international jet set. Whenever anyone writes a diary column for a magazine such as The Spectator, say Joan Collins or The Duchess of Kent, it always starts with something like: "To Villa Este for Count Borginose's 60th birthday celebrations. Paolo De Montiforte was there, looking not a day older than he did at Jonny Morgan's legendary bash in Naples in the summer of 1958."

Terence Blacker: When self-exposure is a necessary evil

A rampant alternative reality will clearly have a profound effect on the way we live and work

Rose clears out the old guard at M&S

Half-year profits collapse as like-for-like sales fall 4% - Battle to fight off Philip Green cost £35m

M&S chief tells investors retailer 'is no basket case'

Stuart Rose, the chief executive of Marks & Spencer, said yesterday the flagging high street retailer would come out fighting for this year's Christmas period, saying the business was not the "basket case" its critics believed.

Rose spends £575,000 on M&S shares

Stuart Rose, the chief executive of Marks & Spencer, spent £575,000 yesterday buying shares in the retailer that last week saw off a £9.1bn bid attempt from Philip Green.

Rose: Marks is formal, middle-class and boring

It was back to basics yesterday for Stuart Rose, the Marks & Spencer chief executive, when it came to explaining how he was going to fix M&S, a store chain which he admitted was seen as "formal, middle-class and boring".

Rose goes on offensive in row with Goldman Sachs

Stuart Rose, the chief executive of Marks & Spencer, last night resorted to the Data Protection Act in the latest twist to the escalating row between himself and Goldman Sachs, the investment bank he claims is guilty of trying to damage his reputation.

Friends

Philip Green's friends are a lucky bunch. Three of them - Tom Hunter, Michael Spencer and Stuart Rose (among Britain's richest men) - made enormous profits when their pal made a bid to take over Marks & Spencer. They shortly before bought huge numbers of shares in the company. All three deny knowledge of Mr Green's imminent bid, of course, but the Financial Services Authority has launched an investigation. Whether these men are found guilty or not, it was hardly a wise move by any of them. The impression, even if wrong, that this group of wealthy men have abused their position will not be easily expunged.

Rose defends M&S share dealings ahead of FSA questioning

Investors back embattled chief executive * Goldman's refuses to retract claims

Rose tells M&S clothing suppliers to slash prices

Stuart Rose, Marks & Spencer's new chief executive, is putting pressure on the retailer's clothing suppliers to slash their prices as he seeks to shake up the group's supply chain. Industry sources said Mr Rose had asked some of M&S's top clothing suppliers to lower the prices they charge by 5 to 7 per cent.

Rose to set out blueprint for reviving M&S

Stuart Rose yesterday whetted investors' appetites by promising to come up with a blueprint for transforming Marks & Spencer's fortunes in less than four weeks.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

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Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003
Barbara Woodward: Britain's first female ambassador to China intends to forge strong links with the growing economic superpower

Our woman in Beijing builds a new relationship

Britain's first female ambassador to China intends to forge strong links with growing economic power
Courage is rare. True humility is even rarer. But the only British soldier to be awarded the Victoria Cross in Afghanistan has both

Courage is rare. True humility is even rarer

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Alexander McQueen: The catwalk was a stage for the designer's astonishing and troubling vision

Alexander McQueen's astonishing vision

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New BBC series savours half a century of food in Britain, from Vesta curries to nouvelle cuisine

Dinner through the decades

A new BBC series challenged Brandon Robshaw and his family to eat their way from the 1950s to the 1990s