Life and Style Tamiflu: The £424m drug – that may not work

Damning report by MPs warns that doctors and patients are being ‘undermined’ on treatment options

Johann Hari: The hidden truth behind drug company profits

Ring-fencing medical knowledge is one of the great grotesqueries of our age

Tamiflu researchers warn of child nightmares

More than half of children taking Tamiflu suffer side-effects such as nausea, insomnia and nightmares, researchers said.

Swine flu pregnancy alert raised

Mums-to-be 'four times more likely' to need hospital treatment

David Prosser: Winners and losers in the swine flu crisis

Outlook Executives at GlaxoSmithKline and other drugs companies could be forgiven for being a tad peeved about the lack of reaction to the strong growth reported yesterday by PZ Cussons. When GSK said it was benefiting from a surge in demand for its anti-flu drugs, it was accused of profiteering on the back of swine flu, but no one seems to think PZ Cussons is cashing in despite its soaring sales of anti-bacterial handwash.

Dozens fall victim to side effects of swine flu drug

UK drugs agency reveals 150 people have reported mild reactions to Tamiflu

The Feral Beast: Passport to the editor's office

Alarming reports from The Guardian, where six catering staff were dramatically sacked last week over "irregularities with their papers".

Swine Flu Plc: Cashing in on the pandemic

Huge pharmaceutical companies, face-mask manufacturers and even internet opportunists are raking in the money. Tim Persinko and Susie Mesure report

Victim who couldn't find a bed is flown to Sweden

Academic accuses Government of causing unnecessary worry among parents

Simon Calder: Treat the travel bug with common sense

The last travel-related bug to cause such consternation was less tangible. A decade ago the tourism industry worked itself into a frenzy predicting the likely effects of the "Millennium Bug", when the clocks driving primitive computers ticked over from year 99 to 00.

Children in frontline as swine flu cases double

100,000 new cases heighten concerns over intensive care beds for youngsters

Swine flu: Tales from the front line of pandemic Britain

A rising death toll... Conflicting advice for pregnant women... New dedicated Tamiflu depots and NHS helplines. The H1N1 virus is spreading. And for many Britons, the pandemic is already shaping everyday life

Lisa Markwell: There could be a bright side to the flu crisis...

Should schools stay closed in September in a bid to slow the spread of swine flu? Your guess is as good as mine, or indeed a minister's. The maddeningly oblique messages coming out of the health ministry, the doctors' surgeries and over the garden wall do nothing to calm us. Working in central London at the height of holiday season means coming eye-to-eye with folk in surgical masks (there's no such thing as face-to-face when the face is obscured). Do they know something we don't? A friend travelling through Gatwick airport on Monday witnessed a whole planeload of tourists donning masks and gloves as the doors switched to manual.

Swine flu: School closures declared 'unlikely'





School closures in the autumn to curb the number of swine flu infections are unlikely at the moment and would have an "extremely disruptive" effect on society, the Chief Medical Officer said today.

Swine flu in Britain: The guessing game

As the pandemic spreads, the NHS and other public services are preparing for the worst-case scenario – but they have no real idea of how bad the situation might get. Nina Lakhani reports

Dr Laurance Buckman: Reassurance is the key to keeping the public calm

Dealing with patients' concerns over swine flu is taking vast amounts of doctors' time away from patients that are actually ill. More of my time nowadays is spent reassuring and informing patients about swine flu than actually diagnosing them with it.

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The Banksy image in Folkestone before it was vandalised
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Life and Style
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Sales of the tablet are set to fall again, say analysts

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football West Brom vs Man Utd match report: Blind grabs point, but away form a problem for Van Gaal
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Gotham is coming to UK shores this autumn
tvGotham, episode 2, review
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Bloom Time: Mira Sorvino
tvMira Sorvino on leaving movie roles for 'The Intruders'
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First woman: Valentina Tereshkova
peopleNASA guinea pig Kate Greene thinks it might fly
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Brian Harvey turned up at Downing Street today demanding to speak to the Prime Minister
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Met Police confirm there was a 'minor disturbance' and that no-one was arrested

Arts and Entertainment
George Lucas poses with a group of Star Wars-inspired Disney characters at Disney's Hollywood Studios in 2010
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George Lucas criticises the major Hollywood film studios

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Chris Grayling, Justice Secretary: 'There are pressures which we are facing but there is not a crisis'
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Does Chris Grayling realise what a vague concept he is dealing with?

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Berlin, Dresden, Meissen & Colditz
Prices correct as of 17 October 2014
Two super-sized ships have cruised into British waters, but how big can these behemoths get?

Super-sized ships: How big can they get?

Two of the largest vessels in the world cruised into UK waters last week
British doctors on brink of 'cure' for paralysis with spinal cord treatment

British doctors on brink of cure for paralysis

Sufferers can now be offered the possibility of cure thanks to a revolutionary implant of regenerative cells
Ranked seventh in world’s best tourist cities - not London, or Edinburgh, but Salisbury

Salisbury ranked seventh in world’s best tourist cities

The city is home to one of the four surviving copies of the Magna Carta, along with the world’s oldest mechanical clock
Let's talk about loss

We need to talk about loss

Secrecy and silence surround stillbirth
Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Women may be better suited to space travel than men are
Oscar Pistorius sentencing: The athlete's wealth and notoriety have provoked a long overdue debate on South African prisons

'They poured water on, then electrified me...'

If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why
How to dress with authority: Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear

How to dress with authority

Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear
New book on Joy Division's Ian Curtis sheds new light on the life of the late singer

New book on Ian Curtis sheds fresh light on the life of the late singer

'Joy Division were making art... Ian was for real' says author Jon Savage
Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

The Bafta-winner talks Hollywood, being branded a psycho, and how Barbra Streisand is his true inspiration
Tim Minchin, interview: The musician, comedian and world's favourite ginger is on scorching form

Tim Minchin interview

For a no-holds-barred comedian who is scathing about woolly thinking and oppressive religiosity, he is surprisingly gentle in person
Boris Johnson's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Boris's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Many of us Brits still disapprove of conspicuous consumption – it's the way we were raised, says DJ Taylor
Ash frontman Tim Wheeler reveals how he came to terms with his father's dementia

Tim Wheeler: Alzheimer's, memories and my dad

Wheeler's dad suffered from Alzheimer's for three years. When he died, there was only one way the Ash frontman knew how to respond: with a heartfelt solo album