Arts and Entertainment Dominique Gonzalez-Foester's installation 'TH.2058' which opened in October 2008 at the Tate modern

Tate Modern has ensured another decade of popular large-scale installations in its Turbine Hall – which has hosted work from Ai Weiwei’s porcelain sunflower seeds to Olafur Eliasson’s giant sun – after signing its “largest and longest” sponsorship deal.

A day in the life of art's hottest city

As collectors descend on London for the Frieze Art Fair and The New York Times applauds the capital's 'dizzying' array of new exhibitions, Arifa Akbar sets off to see them all in one go

Michael Glover: A journey into the terror of sensory deprivation – nearly

The sheer terrible sobriety puts one in mind of Balka's other pessimistic works

Gallery visitors invited to enter 'black hole'

A huge "black hole" was unveiled today as the latest exhibition at the Tate Modern.

Leading article: Dark arts

Visitors to modern art galleries often say they have been left in the dark. Those heading for Tate Modern from today onwards will be able to make that complaint almost literally. The Polish artist Miroslaw Balka has turned the gallery's Turbine Hall into a black hole. The installation, entitled "How It Is", is designed to evoke feelings of oppression, fear, disorientation and helplessness. Balka is not toying with people's emotions. His intentions are very serious, for he says his work is influenced by a childhood spent in a village in which many former inhabitants were Jews who died in the Holocaust.

'Ello, 'ello, what's going on ear then?

At first glance it might look like a particularly tasteless advert for Playboy, but the giant inflatable rabbit which spent yesterday floating above bemused shoppers and tourists in central London is in fact a work of art.

What's up Jeff?

A stunning giant rabbit caught shoppers on the hop today as it floated above them.

Pop life: Art in a Material World, Tate Modern, London

In a Warholian world where more is more, Jeff Koons has plenty to brag about ... or has he?

Pop the question: The essential A-Z of what makes a Pop artist

Warhol was one. So were Lichtenstein, Blake and even Hockney (for a while). But Emin and Hirst? As a new Tate exhibition claims them for the movement, Kevin Jackson presents his A-Z primer of Pop Art'

Pop life: Meet the stars of the New York and London art scenes

When new york city's Gramercy Park Hotel opened its doors in May 1994 to a group of gallery owners showcasing the works of their young artists, a "spontaneous" event in one of its rooms involving a British dealer and his female protégé made the city's adrenaline-fuelled art world stop and stare. Tracey Emin, a tousle-haired artist from Margate, had accompanied Jay Jopling, her London dealer and the owner of White Cube Gallery, to the contemporary art fair, which was spread across 32 hired rooms at the Manhattan hotel – and on that Sunday morning, she crept into the bed on which Jopling was perched, impishly covered them both with the embroidered bedspread she was there to sell (for $4,000), and smiled for the cameras.

Tate Modern to stage 'racist' exhibition

London gallery re-enacts controversial 'celebration' of black American stars

Whatley Manor, Easton Grey, Malmesbury, Wiltshire

As Wiltshire locals will tell you, wiping tears of mirth from their eyes, Whatley Manor was once Twatley Farm. From the mid-19th century it was expanded by successive owners, who included a clergyman and a master of the Beaufort Hunt, all apparently unbothered by their hilarious address. Drive up to it today, and it looks rather stern and grey, like a posh orphanage. Once inside the main gates, you encounter a cobbled courtyard lit by a score of garden lamps and the orange glow from leaded windows. It's very welcoming, though not terribly English – possibly because the hotel is owned by a Swiss family, whose design sense owes more to modern Geneva than Victorian Gothic.

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Party Of The Week: Environmentally friendly festivities at Tate Modern

The Tate went environmental as it hosted the official launch party for the 10:10 campaign on Tuesday, which aims to cut 10 per cent of carbon emissions by 2010.

Gilbert & George: The Jack Freak Pictures, White Cube, London

Insofar as anything to do with Gilbert and George can be described as natural, their recent fondness for axes of reflection is it. An axis of reflection is a line – the surface of a pond, say – that divides an object from its mirror image. Since their Tate Modern show in 2007, G&G's work has been full of them.

This 'desert island' is a Danish artist's muse

Charles Darwent travels to Laeso to see why it inspires Per Kirkeby, this summer's star of Tate Modern
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