Arts and Entertainment Dominique Gonzalez-Foester's installation 'TH.2058' which opened in October 2008 at the Tate modern

Tate Modern has ensured another decade of popular large-scale installations in its Turbine Hall – which has hosted work from Ai Weiwei’s porcelain sunflower seeds to Olafur Eliasson’s giant sun – after signing its “largest and longest” sponsorship deal.

JMW Turner's Banks of the Loire (1829), in the National Gallery's Turner Inspired: In the Light of Claude from March

Hockney and Turner take the scenic route

It's a good year for British landscapes, but Munch and Mondrian lead the Continental challenge

Ed Ruscha's 'Standard Station' and 'A Bigger Splash' by David Hockney at the Getty

California dreamers still make a splash

A sprawling, multi-gallery exhibition of West Coast art shines a light on artists who flourished before the market took over their world, says Karen Wright

Eternal Gaze: Lady with an Ermine, a star of the National Gallery's Da Vinci show 

Arts review of 2011 - Visual Art: Calm down – it's just another Leonardo...

Beyond the overbearing and clunking blockbusters, the year's best shows were far-flung, small and perfectly formed

Ai Weiwei and Lu Qing are vocal critics of China's government

Ai Weiwei's wife detained by police

The wife of Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei was detained by police yesterday, the latest move in what has been seen as a concerted campaign to silence one of the government's most vocal critics.

The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living 1991

Has Damien Hirst jumped the shark?

Tate Modern will host the artist's first British retrospective next year. But critics are divided about whether he deserves it

BBC's new home is named worst building in UK

Major buildings by three of Britain's most prestigious architectural practices have been declared to be vile blots on the landscape. And one of them, the BBC's £600m MediaCityUK in Salford, designed by Wilkinson Eyre, has had to take the ultimate shame of winning the 2011 Carbuncle Cup awarded by Building Design magazine.

Leading article: Honey money

What do the Tate Modern, the Bank of England, St Pancras station and now the Stock Exchange have in common? With the installation of two hives on the roof of the London Stock Exchange, these landmarks will all have their own bee colonies – part of a trend towards eco-awareness in the city.

Invasion of the falcons: The peregrine is back in town

After decades of declining numbers, the world's fastest creature is populating Britain's cities once again. One pair has even set up home at Tate Modern

The stolen Turners, the Serbian underworld, and a £24m insurance job

The Tate's extraordinary coup in securing both a massive payout and the return of the masterpieces can be told at last. Matthew Bell investigates

Alice-Azania Jarvis: It turns out London can be cheap and cheerful

London is expensive. Extortionately so – or so runs the conventional wisdom. And it's true: a pint in a Zone One pub costs considerably more than it does anywhere else. The tube is both a necessity and a luxury: yes, it gets you from A to B, but it's also pricey, crowded, dirty and unreliable. And that's before you even take into account the lack of large-scale supermarkets, shunned in favour of their more expensive "metro" equivalents. There's no doubting that London living isn't cheap. But what do visitors to the big city think?

Ai Weiwei's cousin freed but associates still missing

Ai Weiwei's voice on the phone was tired, cautious at first, then friendly. So how is he after three months' detention? "I'm OK, I'm very happy to be home, to be free after such a difficult time. Now I'm on bail I'm not supposed to talk about anything," he said.

Michael Clark Company, Tate Modern, London<br/>Strictly Gershwin, Royal Albert Hall, London

A Turbine Hall triumph &ndash; who says bigger can't be better?

Michael Clark Company, Tate Modern, London

Michael Clark's new work for Tate Modern starts after sunset, with twilight visible through the skylights of the Turbine Hall. The piece builds on last year's residency at the gallery, when Clark worked with public volunteers in weekly workshops. A large volunteer cast move in blocks, set against the taut precision of Clark's own dancers, who strut and stalk with serene cool.

The night I danced for Michael Clark

Tonight ballet's enfant terrible returns to Tate Modern's Turbine Hall with a new work. Laura McLean-Ferris can't wait

Taryn Simon, Tate Modern, London

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Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

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One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
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Smash hit go under the hammer

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These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
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