Arts and Entertainment Dominique Gonzalez-Foester's installation 'TH.2058' which opened in October 2008 at the Tate modern

Tate Modern has ensured another decade of popular large-scale installations in its Turbine Hall – which has hosted work from Ai Weiwei’s porcelain sunflower seeds to Olafur Eliasson’s giant sun – after signing its “largest and longest” sponsorship deal.

JMW Turner's Banks of the Loire (1829), in the National Gallery's Turner Inspired: In the Light of Claude from March

Hockney and Turner take the scenic route

It's a good year for British landscapes, but Munch and Mondrian lead the Continental challenge

Ed Ruscha's 'Standard Station' and 'A Bigger Splash' by David Hockney at the Getty

California dreamers still make a splash

A sprawling, multi-gallery exhibition of West Coast art shines a light on artists who flourished before the market took over their world, says Karen Wright

Eternal Gaze: Lady with an Ermine, a star of the National Gallery's Da Vinci show 

Arts review of 2011 - Visual Art: Calm down – it's just another Leonardo...

Beyond the overbearing and clunking blockbusters, the year's best shows were far-flung, small and perfectly formed

Ai Weiwei and Lu Qing are vocal critics of China's government

Ai Weiwei's wife detained by police

The wife of Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei was detained by police yesterday, the latest move in what has been seen as a concerted campaign to silence one of the government's most vocal critics.

The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living 1991

Has Damien Hirst jumped the shark?

Tate Modern will host the artist's first British retrospective next year. But critics are divided about whether he deserves it

BBC's new home is named worst building in UK

Major buildings by three of Britain's most prestigious architectural practices have been declared to be vile blots on the landscape. And one of them, the BBC's £600m MediaCityUK in Salford, designed by Wilkinson Eyre, has had to take the ultimate shame of winning the 2011 Carbuncle Cup awarded by Building Design magazine.

Leading article: Honey money

What do the Tate Modern, the Bank of England, St Pancras station and now the Stock Exchange have in common? With the installation of two hives on the roof of the London Stock Exchange, these landmarks will all have their own bee colonies – part of a trend towards eco-awareness in the city.

Invasion of the falcons: The peregrine is back in town

After decades of declining numbers, the world's fastest creature is populating Britain's cities once again. One pair has even set up home at Tate Modern

The stolen Turners, the Serbian underworld, and a £24m insurance job

The Tate's extraordinary coup in securing both a massive payout and the return of the masterpieces can be told at last. Matthew Bell investigates

Alice-Azania Jarvis: It turns out London can be cheap and cheerful

London is expensive. Extortionately so – or so runs the conventional wisdom. And it's true: a pint in a Zone One pub costs considerably more than it does anywhere else. The tube is both a necessity and a luxury: yes, it gets you from A to B, but it's also pricey, crowded, dirty and unreliable. And that's before you even take into account the lack of large-scale supermarkets, shunned in favour of their more expensive "metro" equivalents. There's no doubting that London living isn't cheap. But what do visitors to the big city think?

Ai Weiwei's cousin freed but associates still missing

Ai Weiwei's voice on the phone was tired, cautious at first, then friendly. So how is he after three months' detention? "I'm OK, I'm very happy to be home, to be free after such a difficult time. Now I'm on bail I'm not supposed to talk about anything," he said.

Michael Clark Company, Tate Modern, London<br/>Strictly Gershwin, Royal Albert Hall, London

A Turbine Hall triumph &ndash; who says bigger can't be better?

Michael Clark Company, Tate Modern, London

Michael Clark's new work for Tate Modern starts after sunset, with twilight visible through the skylights of the Turbine Hall. The piece builds on last year's residency at the gallery, when Clark worked with public volunteers in weekly workshops. A large volunteer cast move in blocks, set against the taut precision of Clark's own dancers, who strut and stalk with serene cool.

The night I danced for Michael Clark

Tonight ballet's enfant terrible returns to Tate Modern's Turbine Hall with a new work. Laura McLean-Ferris can't wait

Taryn Simon, Tate Modern, London

Family life reveals its true face
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Israel-Gaza conflict: No victory for Israel despite weeks of death and devastation

Robert Fisk: No victory for Israel despite weeks of devastation

Palestinians have won: they are still in Gaza, and Hamas is still there
Mary Beard writes character reference for Twitter troll who called her a 'slut'

Unlikely friends: Mary Beard and the troll who called her a ‘filthy old slut’

The Cambridge University classicist even wrote the student a character reference
America’s new apartheid: Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone

America’s new apartheid

Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone
Amazon is buying Twitch for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?

What is the appeal of Twitch?

Amazon is buying the video-game-themed online streaming site for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?
Tip-tapping typewriters, ripe pongs and slides in the office: Bosses are inventing surprising ways of making us work harder

How bosses are making us work harder

As it is revealed that one newspaper office pumps out the sound of typewriters to increase productivity, Gillian Orr explores the other devices designed to motivate staff
Manufacturers are struggling to keep up with the resurgence in vinyl records

Hard pressed: Resurgence in vinyl records

As the resurgence in vinyl records continues, manufacturers and their outdated machinery are struggling to keep up with the demand
Tony Jordan: 'I turned down the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series nine times ... then I found a kindred spirit'

A tale of two writers

Offered the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series, Tony Jordan turned it down. Nine times. The man behind EastEnders and Life on Mars didn’t feel right for the job. Finally, he gave in - and found an unexpected kindred spirit
Could a later start to the school day be the most useful educational reform of all?

Should pupils get a lie in?

Doctors want a later start to the school day so that pupils can sleep later. Not because teenagers are lazy, explains Simon Usborne - it's all down to their circadian rhythms
Prepare for Jewish jokes – as Jewish comedians get their own festival

Prepare for Jewish jokes...

... as Jewish comedians get their own festival
SJ Watson: 'I still can't quite believe that Before I Go to Sleep started in my head'

A dream come true for SJ Watson

Watson was working part time in the NHS when his debut novel, Before I Go to Sleep, became a bestseller. Now it's a Hollywood movie, too. Here he recalls the whirlwind journey from children’s ward to A-list film set
10 best cycling bags for commuters

10 best cycling bags for commuters

Gear up for next week’s National Cycle to Work day with one of these practical backpacks and messenger bags
Paul Scholes: Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United

Paul Scholes column

Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United
Kate Bush, Hammersmith Apollo music review: A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it

Kate Bush shows a voice untroubled by time

A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it
Robot sheepdog technology could be used to save people from burning buildings

The science of herding is cracked

Mathematical model would allow robots to be programmed to control crowds and save people from burning buildings
Tyrant: Is the world ready for a Middle Eastern 'Dallas'?

This tyrant doesn’t rule

It’s billed as a Middle Eastern ‘Dallas’, so why does Fox’s new drama have a white British star?