Arts and Entertainment Dominique Gonzalez-Foester's installation 'TH.2058' which opened in October 2008 at the Tate modern

Tate Modern has ensured another decade of popular large-scale installations in its Turbine Hall – which has hosted work from Ai Weiwei’s porcelain sunflower seeds to Olafur Eliasson’s giant sun – after signing its “largest and longest” sponsorship deal.

Ai Weiwei: Sunflower Seeds, Tate Modern Turbine Hall, London

An ode to the lost and forgotten

Gauguin: Maker of Myth, Tate Modern, London

Tahiti was only part of the painter’s colourful story

Gauguin uncovered

An insatiable desire to get to the man behind the paintings has taken the gloss off Tate Modern's new blockbuster, says Michael Glover

Protests 'frightening' for book party guests, says Tony Blair

Tony Blair called off a party tonight to mark the launch of his new book, saying it would be "frightening" for his friends to have to walk past anti-war protesters.

Tony Blair book launch party cancelled

A party to mark the launch of Tony Blair's new book tonight, which would have attracted protests from anti-war campaigners, has been called off, it was revealed today.

Travel By Numbers: Tahiti

With a Gauguin exhibition soon to open at Tate Modern, Harriet Pearce adds up what drew the artist to the island

Eat your art out: Artists develop a taste for food

Antony Gormley's bread bed is back in a new exhibition, and Tate Modern has bought a couscous installation

Francis Alÿs: A Story of Deception, Tate Modern, London

You are walking down a long road between two fields. The road never seems to change, but you keep glimpsing something, close by, in the distance. Is there water on the road ahead? A town? The future flickers and shimmers, you are almost there, on the brink of something, then it vanishes into thin air: a mirage. This is the rather beautiful 16mm film, A Story of Deception (2003-6), filmed in Patagonia, that opens (and gives name to) Francis Alÿs's current survey show at Tate Modern, exploring the crossovers between poetics and politics. The never-reachable moment, a continual glimmer of hope, a pointless struggle – these are the motifs of this brilliant, yet slippery, exhibition. In other films here children build sandcastles to knock them down, the artist pushes a large block of ice around Mexico City until it melts to nothing, or dribbles a line of green paint from a leaky can along the "green line" – the 1948 armistice border between Israel and neighbouring countries. Everything teeters between being depressingly pointless and joyfully, wonderfully so.

London Festival of Architecture 2010

The biennial London Festival of Architecture returns this weekend with a 16-day calendar of 300 events to celebrate the buildings, streets and spaces which shape the UK’s capital.

New Tate Modern director named

Tate Modern has appointed Chris Dercon, who is in charge of the Haus der Kunst in Munich, as its new director.

Louise Bourgeois: 'Shocking, bruising, ghoulish and erotic'

Louise Bourgeois had the ability to make us feel it was she who was observing and judging us, even as we admired her unsettling and strange works of art, says Michael Glover

Exposed: Voyeurism, Surveillance & the Camera, Tate Modern, London

A show at Tate Modern suggests that the supposed objectivity of the lens obscures a much nastier truth

Art in the best possible taste - and flavour

Jellymongers, cheddar cheese sculptures, sugar towers and Smartie mosaics. Matilda Battersby gets a taste of edible art

Knees-up at Tate's 10th

Some of the less enthused visitors to the Tate Modern might be relieved to stumble upon the haven of this pub, complete with bar and piano, as they make their way round the London art gallery.

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