From a planet to a satellite

It took CNN founder Ted Turner 35 years to build up his media empire and he did things his way - blunt, brash and bossy. Now a merger with Time Warner leaves him second-in-command. Can he handle it? By Meg Carter

Murdoch loses US satellite chief

Rupert Murdoch was vowing yesterday to continue his quest to conquer satellite television in the United States in spite of the surprise resignation late on Thursday night of Preston Padden, the head of his US Sky Broadcasting business.

Classical: Crossing frontiers

Philip Glass, Steve Reich, Henryk Gorecki - all are part of the Nonesuch stable. Edward Seckerson meets the man behind America's most idealistic record label

Star Wars: return of the Digger

If Rupert Murdoch's new US satellite deal comes off, it could be his biggest coup of all. He may be able to look down on America and say it's mine at last.

$130m handshake that won't shock anyone

If the British public does not much like it when executives of well-known companies are discovered to have been given seemingly excessive salaries or golden handshakes, it should pause and look at America. Here we are talking not millions but tens of millions. And the moral outrage barely registers.

Murdoch meets his match

Ted Turner, founder of CNN, is taking him on in New York.

Bunny bugged: Murdoch pulls the plug on Britain's latest TV channel

Feud with rival mogul highlights the dangers of concentrating power in the hands of one man, writes Mathew Horsman

People & Business : Behemoths of business put best foot forward in Greece marathon

Readers will be delighted to hear that the former director of MI6, the founder of the Independent, the current headmaster of Gordonstoun and the founder of Postern all survived the weekend.

Time Warner rejection of quick brown Fox sparks conflagration

Rupert Murdoch, used to getting his own way, is fighting a reversal of fortunes, reports David Usborne in New York

Murdoch takes row over Fox TV to court

Rupert Murdoch's Fox News Network filed a lawsuit in a New York federal court last night, seeking to halt Time Warner's planned purchase of Turner Broadcasting Systems because it allegedly violates federal and New York anti-trust laws.

Brand new opportunities arrive in Sesame Street

Bert and Ernie, the muppets best known for their rubber duck routine on the children's television programme Sesame Street, are to become trendy record and movie stars as part of the show's drive to cash in on its strong market position.

Telewest shake-up prompts chief executive's departure

The chief executive of the country's largest cable company is to leave with immediate effect, it emerged last night, in the wake of the latest management shake-up in the struggling UK cable sector.

Time Warner merger approved

After weeks of nervous delay, the mega-merger between Time Warner and Turner Broadcasting to create the world's largest media giant, surpassing even the Disney Company, is set to be formally approved by United States regulators.

To censor or not? Finally an answer without slogans

One of the great arguments missing from our time is about the effects of pop culture, which is now the dominant culture, on ourselves and our children. Of course, the argument doesn't seem to be missing. It seems, in fact, loud and ever-present. It tends to split the old from the young, the religious from the secular, the conservative right from the liberal left. You can read one side in the Daily Mail and the other in the Guardian. One side says: "Violent images breed real violence - stop it, censor it!" The other replies: "Prove it, prove it!" And that, usually, is as far as we get; a small bombardment and counter-bombardment from fixed positions, usually about a specific cause celebre (Natural Born Killers, Reservoir Dogs), in which the argument gets lost under the smoke-screen of ad hominem abuse. John Grisham v Oliver Stone; Old Fart, Sussex v Modish Wanker, N1.

Stars of the screen try to salvage the plot

Edward Helmore reports from Idaho on a meeting of the moguls
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
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Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home
Lauded therapist Harley Mille still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Lauded therapist still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Australian Harley Miller is as frustrated by court delays as she is with the idiosyncrasies of immigration law
Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world. But could his predictions of war do the same?

Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world...

But could his predictions of war do the same?
Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs: 'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs
Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities, but why?

Young at hort

Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities. But why are so many people are swapping sweaty clubs for leafy shrubs?
Tim Vine, winner of the Funniest Joke of the Fringe award: 'making a quip as funny as possible is an art'

Beyond a joke

Tim Vine, winner of the Funniest Joke of the Fringe award, has nigh-on 200 in his act. So how are they conceived?
The late Peter O'Toole shines in 'Katherine of Alexandria' despite illness

The late Peter O'Toole shines in 'Katherine of Alexandria' despite illness

Sadly though, the Lawrence of Arabia star is not around to lend his own critique
Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire: The joy of camping in a wetland nature reserve and sleeping under the stars

A wild night out

Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire offers a rare chance to camp in a wetland nature reserve
Comic Sans for Cancer exhibition: It’s the font that’s openly ridiculed for its jaunty style, but figures of fun have their fans

Comic Sans for Cancer exhibition

It’s the font that’s openly ridiculed for its jaunty style, but figures of fun have their fans
Besiktas vs Arsenal: Five things we learnt from the Champions League first-leg tie

Besiktas vs Arsenal

Five things we learnt from the Champions League first-leg tie
Rory McIlroy a smash hit on the US talk show circuit

Rory McIlroy a smash hit on the US talk show circuit

As the Northern Irishman prepares for the Barclays, he finds time to appear on TV in the States, where he’s now such a global superstar that he needs no introduction
Boy racer Max Verstappen stays relaxed over step up to Formula One

Boy racer Max Verstappen stays relaxed over step up to F1

The 16-year-old will become the sport’s youngest-ever driver when he makes his debut for Toro Rosso next season
Fear brings the enemies of Isis together at last

Fear brings the enemies of Isis together at last

But belated attempts to unite will be to no avail if the Sunni caliphate remains strong in Syria, says Patrick Cockburn
Charlie Gilmour: 'I wondered if I would end up killing myself in jail'

Charlie Gilmour: 'I wondered if I'd end up killing myself in jail'

Following last week's report on prison suicides, the former inmate asks how much progress we have made in the 50 years since the abolition of capital punishment