i

Tesla electric cars made safer

Travelodge to create 1,000 new jobs

Budget hotel chain Travelodge is to create 1,000 new jobs at 41 new hotels across the UK this year.

Travelodge and Waitrose in tie-up

Hotel company Travelodge has joined supermarket chain Waitrose to develop three new hotel-and-retail sites, it was announced today.

Business Diary: Sleeping with the senior managers

Here's another example of market research that there was really no need to commission given the predictability of the results.

Letters: Rich get richer, poor get poorer – riots are no surprise

These youngsters are alienated, they do not feel they have a hope for a better life in our society, they do not want to improve their lives by "decent" means, they have given up hope of getting a job they can enjoy doing and earning a salary that would allow them to enjoy the goods they crave.

Simon Read: Is loyalty to your bank all it's cracked up to be?

Yorkshire Building Society announced on Monday that it is taking over the Egg brand, as well as all the savings and mortgage customers of the online bank. It's a good move for the Yorkshire and a good move for the remaining customers of Egg who will become part of a mutual (the credit card users were sold off to Barclaycard earlier this year).

Business Diary: A one-horse race at the LSE?

We hear one of the stumbling blocks to a deal between Nasdaq and the London Stock Exchange is the question of leadership – specifically whether the former's Bob Greifeld or the latter's Xavier Rolet would get the top job in the event of a merger. It's a curious debate – after all, the reason the LSE is in play is that Rolet, for all the good work he has done since taking over in London two years ago, made such a mess of the merger with Canada's TMX. Wouldn't it be a little peculiar to see him get a promotion off the back of that?

Cole Moreton: You can keep Ibiza. Nothing can compare with the British seaside

Summer half-term is once more upon us, and a perfect day at the beach beats Disneyland hands down – but do watch where you swim

Diary: Sky's the limit for Oliver

Alleged hip-hop fan and Downing Street spin chief Craig Oliver doubtless enjoyed a few fist bumps with colleagues yesterday, following the televisual feast that was the No 10 barbecue. Oliver – a former BBC employee – is renowned primarily as a "pictures man", and a shirt-sleeved Dave and Barry serving burgers to servicemen was perhaps the most striking image he has generated since joining the PM's staff (or at least since his first day, when he graced the press corps with this classic, right). Yet the course of media handling never did run smooth and Oliver made at least one influential hack unhappy yesterday. Sky News political correspondent Glen Oglaza was giddy with excitement after being assigned the opening question of the post-BBQ press conference, only to have it snatched from him cruelly at the last moment by Oliver's shiny-domed BBC chum Nick Robinson.

Shipping containers: Think inside the box

Cheap, fun and easy to move, shipping containers are providing building blocks for everything from pop-up malls to prisons. By Victoria-Anne Bull

Diary: Marr was all ears during his coup in the West Wing

If his coyly beatific grin belonged to a figure gazing upon Jesus in a Renaissance painting, let no one blame Andrew Marr for that. Getting quality time alone with Barack Obama, as Andy did for the interview broadcast yesterday, isn't easy. Nick Clegg would tell you that. The snub for Nick, whose pleas for an audience during the state visit were rebuffed, must be excruciating. It is almost as if the White House concluded, in the worst foreign policy miscalculation since 'Nam, that our deputy PM isn't fantastically important. Andy, on the other hand, is. He recovered from recent embarrassments to score an interview that West Wing insiders are styling "The 'Ears? You call those weeny things ears?' Summit".

Business Diary: Chancellor plays the funny man

George Osborne couldn't resist the opportunity to get a cheap laugh out of the audience at the Google Zeitgeist conference yesterday, where he was the first speaker of the day. The reason the Chancellor was given the early slot was to allow him to get away in plenty of time for the European finance ministers' meeting in Brussels, an event that in the end was rather overshadowed by the arrest of the International Monetary Fund boss. "Not everyone is going to be there," Osborne observed tartly.

Travelodge expands in Spain as holidaymakers cut their budgets

The UK hotel chain will be one of few low-cost options in cities such as Barcelona and Seville

Business Diary: Consider the Krugman Factor

The Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman is fighting back following an exchange between Glenn Beck and Bill O'Reilly, the right-wing shock jocks of American television. Describing Krugman as one of the "far left", O'Reilly said that he and the likes of "Soros and his merry men" were intent on destroying the American economy so that they would be free to "build up a socialist system". O'Reilly is on to something, confesses Krugman on his blog, adding "Luckily, he hasn't learned about our plan to steal his precious bodily fluids." It's hardly a fair fight, intellectually, this one.

A day out in Tourkey, anyone?

Britons may be heading for the coast in their thousands this weekend but many cannot spell the names of some of our most famous seaside resorts.

Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence