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The governor of Okinawa has approved controversial plans to relocate a US Marine base to a less populous area – but said he would keep pressing to move the base off the of the Japanese island altogether.

Reporter's death 'not preventable'

The war reporter Rupert Hamer was the victim of a "cold-blooded killing", a coroner said yesterday. The 39-year-old was the first British journalist to be killed in Afghanistan; he was travelling in a US Marine Corps armoured vehicle when it was hit by a roadside bomb.

Japan nuclear plant breach feared

A suspected breach in the reactor at the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant could mean more serious radioactive contamination, Japanese officials have said.

Fair Game, Doug Liman, 106 mins (12)<br/>The Company Men, John Wells, 104 mins (15)<br/>Battle: Los Angeles, Jonathan Liebesman, 117 mins (12A)

A true story, compellingly acted &ndash; but I don't remember the Iraq war being this predictable

US diplomat calls Okinawans 'lazy'

A senior US diplomat supervising Japan affairs has been replaced for allegedly making disparaging comments about Japanese people living on a southern island where US troops are based.

Scott Ritter: Trial begins for anti-war hero shamed by sex sting

Scott Ritter, the former UN weapons inspector who strived to put the brakes on the 2003 invasion of Iraq by loudly disputing claims by Washington and London that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction, was in court in Pennsylvania last night on charges of soliciting sex with a minor over the internet.

Anger at Manning's 'naked punishment'

The young American soldier who has been charged with leaking confidential cables to the WikiLeaks website is being forced to sleep naked in his cell and stand outside each morning to be handed back his clothes because he made a single sarcastic quip, his lawyer has claimed.

A soldier writes from Afghanistan

A serving British soldier in Afghanistan, enraged by last week&rsquo;s news of Army sackings-by email, believes our forces are being taken for granted. He decided to tell The IoS of his feelings...

Osama bin Laden, By Michael Scheuer

How the West got Bin Laden all wrong

Japan promises to bring home soldiers who died at Iwo Jima

The Japanese Prime Minister, Naoto Kan, has vowed to bring closure to one of the Second World War's most notorious and iconic episodes, promising to bring home the remains of the 12,000 soldiers still missing after the battle of Iwo Jima.

Green energy plan at military bases

British military bases on the front line in Afghanistan could be run on solar and wind energy in future under Ministry of Defence plans.

Taliban 'killing their own' in bid to wrest back control in Sangin

Taliban gunmen have begun assassinating their own rank and file in a desperate bid to stop a remote mountain valley sliding from their grasp, as well as bringing in new commanders to oversee their fightback in Sangin, Afghanistan's most violent district, The Independent can reveal.

Wes Santee: US runner who came agonisingly close to breaking the four-minute-mile barrier

If, in early 1954, you had made a book on the first runner to break the four-minute barrier, the American Wes Santee, who has died aged 78 from cancer, might have received shorter odds than either Australia's John Landy or Britain's Roger Bannister. Santee was ranked second in the world at both 800 and 1500 metres, with a fast finishing kick. Bannister, of course, got there first, running 3:59.4 on 6 May 1954, and Landy lowered the mark to 3:58 in June. But while Bannister's record attempt at Oxford was structured carefully, with "rabbits" pacemaking him through each lap, Santee was competing for Kansas University, in meets where he typically ran both 880 yards and the mile, and anchored the 4x440 relay. When told of Bannister's feat, Santee was "not exceptionally disappointed", claiming he would be satisfied to become the first American through the barrier, and that he could, anyway, beat Bannister in a race.

Home from Helmand: Why leaving the front line isn&rsquo;t always easy

What is it like returning to normal life after being at war? Terri Judd meets the soldiers adjusting to a more peaceful existence, with all the relief, joy and bewilderment that brings

Monsters, Gareth Edwiards, 93 mins (12A)Megamind, Tom McGrath, 95 mins (PG) Secretariat, Randall Wallace, 123 Mins (U)

Giant octopus with a chemistry overload, a goofball chaser, oh, and a side order of cheese
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Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent
Markus Persson: If being that rich is so bad, why not just give it all away?

That's a bit rich

The billionaire inventor of computer game Minecraft says he is bored, lonely and isolated by his vast wealth. If it’s that bad, says Simon Kelner, why not just give it all away?
Euro 2016: Chris Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Wales last qualified for major tournament in 1958 but after several near misses the current crop can book place at Euro 2016 and end all the indifference
Rugby World Cup 2015: The tournament's forgotten XV

Forgotten XV of the rugby World Cup

Now the squads are out, Chris Hewett picks a side of stars who missed the cut
A groundbreaking study of 'Britain's Atlantis' long buried at the bottom of the North Sea could revolutionise how we see our prehistoric past

Britain's Atlantis

Scientific study beneath North Sea could revolutionise how we see the past
The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember,' says Starkey

The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember'

David Starkey's assessment
Oliver Sacks said his life has been 'an enormous privilege and adventure'

'An enormous privilege and adventure'

Oliver Sacks writing about his life
'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

The Rock's Chief Minister hits back at Spanish government's 'lies'
Britain is still addicted to 'dirty coal'

Britain still addicted to 'dirty' coal

Biggest energy suppliers are more dependent on fossil fuel than a decade ago
Orthorexia nervosa: How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition

Orthorexia nervosa

How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition
Lady Chatterley is not obscene, says TV director

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Director Jed Mercurio on why DH Lawrence's novel 'is not an obscene story'
Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests

Set a pest to catch a pest

Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests