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Michael Gove is a no-nonsense sort of chap, unafraid to shake his fist at the Human Rights Act. In 2011, the Education Secretary vowed to crack down on unruly pupils, whatever Europe said about their rights, and last year he led the cabinet's huffing and puffing when it looked as if Abu Qatada couldn't be deported. So how surprising to learn he is the trustee of a charity dedicated to promoting, er, human rights! The Charity Commission lists Gove as one of only two trustees of something called the European Freedom Fund. The other is the neocon writer and activist Douglas Murray. Their objective is "the promotion of respect for human rights as set out in the European Convention of Human Rights and fundamental freedoms adopted by the members of the council of Europe on 4th November 1950 and the convention's five protocols". This could put Gove in a tricky position when the Tories come to replacing the Human Rights Act with a British Bill of Rights. Still, the EFF hasn't been too busy: no money has gone in or out since it was founded in 2007. Molto strano!

Rockers produce the mother of all lists

POPULAR MUSIC fans enjoy making lists. This mildly obsessive tendency, popularised in Nick Hornby's tribute to male sadness, High Fidelity, occupies adherents for untold hours as they compile their top five love songs or best tracks featuring the zither.

Cheltenham Festival: Professional punter

YOU COULD take pounds 1 million to Cheltenham today and still come home with nothing - that's how hard this afternoon's card looks.

Racing: Success lurks in the pool

LOSING MONEY to those pleasant females in Cheltenham's Tote booths is somehow more tolerable than losing it to a surly boards-bookie. But there are other reasons to prefer Tote pool betting at the Festival.

Travel: World Music: The Summer Of 69, Home Counties Style

THE FAROES are 30 years too late; the future of music was sealed in the summer of 1969 - though not at the celebrated Woodstock festival. Instead, southern England was venue for a noisy revolution. Emily (and 15,000 others) saw Pink Floyd play Plumpton, Dylan took a ferry 'cross the Solent to the Isle of Wight, and the Stones spent the afternoon together in London's Hyde Park with an audience equivalent to three times the population of the Faroes .

Racing: Pipe keeps a close guard on Cyfor plan

CYFOR MALTA, unraced since winning the Murphy's Gold Cup in November, is to return at Cheltenham on Saturday. The Martin Pipe-trained gelding, who has the Gold Cup or Champion Chase as possible Festival targets, has a choice on Saturday between the Pillar Chase or Ladbroke Handicap Chase.

Racing: Moulin joins Williams

EDELWEIS DU Moulin has become the latest Cheltenham Festival hope to join Venetia Williams. He was previously trained by the late Gordon Richards, for whom he won four novice chases last season before sustaining an injury when runner-up at Ayr in April.

POP: SLEEVE NOTES

Thirty years after its first fabled outing and just five years after its second less successful coming, the Woodstock festival comes to Europe. Woodstock '99 hopes to attract 300,000 people to a purpose built site 400km outside of Vienna on the weekend of 16 to 18 July. The following weekend the whole show will move onto the festival's 1994 site near Saugerties in Upstate New York, close to the famous village itself. To date no artists have been confirmed but Michael Lang, one of the original co-founders of the '69 fest and the main organiser of the 1994 repeat, promises "an amazing line-up which will include the best of international talent to be found in the world today and some never to be repeated collaborations". Tickets for Woodstock '99 are on sale on the Internet (www.oeticket.com).

Letter: Stand by your words

Sir: When Steve Richards writes, "They sat around the top table, uncertain where they stood", I must conclude that he has been over-indulgent during the festive season (Comment, 1 January). However, I am aware that he will not take these remarks of mine lying down.

Racing: Precedent impresses

DANGERUS PRECEDENT established his claims for the Triumph Hurdle at the Cheltenham Festival with a 10-length success over the same course and distance yesterday.

Racing: Indicators point in direction of Malta

The former top jump jockey Steve Smith Eccles analyses today's Murphy's Gold Cup

Notting hill carnival

Two million revellers are expected at Notting Hill's 33rd annual carnival, this bank holiday Sunday and Monday. Tomorrow is devoted to children, while adult festivities take place on Monday. The celebrations start each day at noon, finishing between 7pm-7.30pm. Horniman's Pleasance is also the venue for the National Steel Bands' Panorama on tonight, 7-11.30pm. These 12 Steel bands continue playing over the weekend and as the Carnival winds along the streets attractions will also include Mas' (75 costume bands), Calypso, and both Soca (a fusion of soul and calypso) and Static Sound Systems.

Suffolk folk festival

If the Reading festival is too big and rocky for your tastes, try the intimate Suffolk & Good Festival this weekend, a family-oriented rootsy event with a capacity of just 3,000. An extensive and cosmopolitan bill is headed by ex-Planxty man Paul Brady who is backed up by Woodstock veteran Richie Havens, the prolific Nick Lowe and perennial folk circuit favourite John Martyn (above). Further down the two-day bill are Mercury Music Prize nominee Eliza Carthy, Irish singer-songwriter Sinead Lohan, Papa Wemba's 10-piece Zairean band and French-Canadian outfit Gwazigan. There's also American mountain music, Celtic folk, a touch of quality country and lots more on offer.

EDINBURGH FESTIVAL '98: Theatre; Verbal assault and battery

CRAVE TRAVERSE THEATRE

How We Met: John Boorman And Pamela Marvin

British film director John Boorman, 65, gained worldwide recognition in 1967 for 'Point Blank', a stylish thriller starring American icon Lee Marvin. Many acclaimed movies followed, among them 'Hell in the Pacific', 'Deliverance', 'Hope and Glory' and 'The General' - which won him Best Director at this year's Cannes film festival. He has just completed a documentary on the life and work of Lee Marvin. Pamela Marvin, 68, worked as a radio producer in the 1960s, and was divorced three times before she married Lee Marvin, her childhood sweetheart, in 1970. They remained together until his death in 1987, after which she wrote the affectionate memoir 'Lee: A Romance'. She now lives in Tucson, Arizona and Woodstock, New York
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