Diary: Facebook film... an update

The factual accuracy of The Social Network, the film about the founding of Facebook, is disputed by those it depicts. Now it seems that those involved in the movie took little trouble to learn about its subject.

Jesse Eisenberg, who stars as Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, claims he doesn't use the service because "people have written mean things about me on the internet and, as a self-hating person, I didn't want to contribute to that".

Justin Timberlake, who plays Zuckerberg's associate Sean Parker, says he's far too busy for social networking. "I don't get a lot of free time," he explains, "and [when I do] I watch Sports Centre."

The screenwriter Aaron Sorkin "knows almost nothing about the 2010 iteration of Facebook", reports New York magazine. "His interest in computer-aided communication goes only as far as emailing his friends."

Eisenberg's British co-star Andrew Garfield doesn't use it. Even the director, David Fincher, doesn't use it. And Trent Reznor, who wrote the soundtrack, has only this to say on the subject: "Facebook sucks."

* After being fired from Oasis by Gallagher (N) in 1995, the band's original drummer, Tony McCarroll, sued for his slice of the five-album deal. This week, McCarroll, 38, publishes his version of the now-defunct band's early history: Oasis: The Truth, The Noel Truth Is Nothing Like The Truth.

Perhaps his most incendiary revelation is that the band's beginnings were funded by footballers, not from the Gallaghers' beloved Manchester City but from arch-rivals United. While struggling as musicians, McCarroll writes, both he and Gallagher (L) worked for a car valeting firm which serviced the vehicles of United's stars.

The players' business was secured after McCarroll's boss, one "BigUn", tricked Gallagher (L) into delivering a fake love letter to Reds striker Mark Hughes, who saw the funny side. Among BigUn's Old Trafford clients were Paul Ince, whose wheel arches Gallagher (L) wrecked by scrubbing them with wire wool, and Eric Cantona, whose new Mercedes lost a driver's door while in their care. Both incidents, claims McCarroll, were unfortunate accidents. I believe you, Tony – thousands wouldn't.

* Another year, another "informal ban" on champagne at the Conservative Party conference. And, once again, that ban is being flouted shamelessly. On Sunday evening, Veuve Clicquot flowed freely at the Conservative Pride gay night, attended by senior Tories including the Justice Minister, Nick Herbert (though not the Foreign Secretary, William Hague).

Meanwhile, across Birmingham, the popular Tesco/Conservative Councillors' Association Champagne Reception was welcoming the Communities Secretary, Eric Pickles, who, in his former role as party chairman, was responsible for imposing last year's ban (whether he partook personally is unclear; does Tesco champagne even count?). Finally, in a faraway corner of the conference venue, a Harvey Nichols stand was selling bottles of its own-brand bubbly for a budget-busting £25.50. Much to my disappointment, photographers have yet to come across any senior Tories actually drinking it.

* Often overlooked by the rock establishment, the Lib Dems have at least one staunch guitar-playing supporter in Roy Stride, the lead singer of, erm, Scouting For Girls. "We are big Coalition supporters," Stride told me at last week's BT Digital Music Awards. "I'm surprised Nick Clegg hasn't been to any of our gigs. He lives round the corner from me." As does Simon Le Bon, Stride's bandmate Greg Churchouse reminded him: "What a supergroup that would be. Simon Le Bon, Roy Stride and Nick Clegg." Cover your ears, Crosby, Stills and Nash.



* Some reading material for Stride, due out next summer: the first biography of the aforementioned Clegg. Journalist Chris Bowers is doing the honours. A Lib Dem candidate at the last general election, Bowers has worked with Clegg personally. The publisher Biteback says of the scintillating-sounding Nick Clegg: The Biography, that it will chart his political rise as well as "the extraordinary family history that helps define him as a politician". More importantly, will it reveal the identities of his 29 (or thereabouts) sexual conquests?

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