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Sports science: join the elite giving British athletes a cutting edge

The UK’s sports science graduates are leading the pack, says Stephen Hoare

A world of extreme weather solutions

With the increase in natural disasters, climate change degrees are in hot demand. By Stephen Hoare

Postgrad Lives: "The challenge of passing each year is very rewarding"

Interview by Steve McCormack

Move up a rung on the strategic marketing ladder

Russ Thorne maps a two-stage route to chartered status

Postgrad Queries: "Will postgraduate fees go up? Can a second degree overcome a poor first?"

How are fees going to change for postgraduate students?

Fees for most postgraduate courses, whether taught Masters or PhDs, have always been much more closely linked to the real cost of running the courses than those for undergraduate degrees. And fees have always varied a lot. You can find a taught Masters in history or town planning for around £4,000 to £5,000, whereas courses requiring expensive facilities, such as science subjects and engineering, can charge double that.

Research Matters: ‘Graduates with quantitive methods skills are increasingly sought after’

Mention quantitive methods to any social science student and the chances are they’ll roll their eyes, mutter something about number crunching and move hastily on to something they find more interesting.



The future’s bright if you’re clear about your present

Research, patience and bargaining are key to securing a course tailored for you, says Jessica Moore

Postgraduate Lives: 'Oxford on my CV might improve my chances'

Laura Syrett, 24, is studying for an MSt in English literature at Oxford University, having earned a first in English at the University of Durham. She started the course having done one year of a law conversion, with a view to becoming a barrister.

Research Matters: ‘Demand for researchers is higher than ever’

It’s an excellent thing that more and more students are graduating from UK higher education institutions. But how will this affect those exceptionally talented students who wish to continue their studies? Will it be harder for them to secure a good career having delayed entry into the job market? Will they be overqualified and underprepared?

Gain or drain? How study abroad affects our economy

Far from depriving the UK of valuable talent, 'graduate migration' can offer many benefits, says Jessica Moore

A second degree is essential in healthcare

Postgraduate study is hard, competitive, expensive – and, in the health sector, can be the key to progression. "There is an expectation that senior healthcare professionals will have a postgraduate qualification if they're going to take on responsibility for designing and leading services for the future, and innovating in their practice," says Liz Clark, senior lecturer in health and social care at the Open University (OU).

Postgrad Lives: 'Our professors have invited some great speakers'

Deyan Mihov, 24, is about to start the third term of a one-year MSc in investment management at Cass Business School, part of City University in London. Before starting at Cass, and after finishing school in Bulgaria, he did a Bachelors degree, in business administration, at The Hague University in the Netherlands, which included a semester at the California Institute of Finance.

Substance and style: The fashion courses that are a cut above

Michael Prest meets the business schools who are queuing up to offer a range of tailored qualifications

Professor Rick Rylance: 'A fellowship can change your career'

Research Councils UK, Champion for research careers

Teaching English overseas: Graduates with a foreign language have a huge edge in the job market

There are pros and cons about being a native speaker of English. One advantage, of course, is the ease with which English speakers can move around the world, on holiday or on business. But a disadvantage is that it breeds laziness. Far too many of us Brits, either consciously or unconsciously, don't really bother with learning a foreign language.

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Day In a Page

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A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

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Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

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Out in the cold: A writer spends a night on the streets and hears the stories of the homeless

A writer spends a night on the streets

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Conchita Wurst becomes a 'bride' on the Paris catwalk - and proves there is life after Eurovision

Conchita becomes a 'bride' on Paris catwalk

Alexander Fury salutes the Eurovision Song Contest winner's latest triumph
Pétanque World Championship in Marseilles hit by

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This year's most acrimonious sporting event took place in France, not Brazil. How did pétanque get so passionate?
Whelks are healthy, versatile and sustainable - so why did we stop eating them in the UK?

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Whelks were the Victorian equivalent of the donor kebab and our stocks are abundant. So why do we now export them all to the Far East?
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The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

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A future Palestine state will have no borders and be an enclave within Israel, surrounded on all sides by Israeli-held territory, says Robert Fisk
A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: The German people demand an end to the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

The German people demand an end to the fighting
New play by Oscar Wilde's grandson reveals what the Irish wit said at his trials

New play reveals what Oscar Wilde said at trials

For a century, what Wilde actually said at his trials was a mystery. But the recent discovery of shorthand notes changed that. Now his grandson Merlin Holland has turned them into a play
Can scientists save the world's sea life from

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Richard III, Trafalgar Studios, review: Martin Freeman gives highly intelligent performance

Richard III review

Martin Freeman’s psychotic monarch is big on mockery but wanting in malice