Arts and Entertainment

From garrulous, gangrenous Jeffrey Bernard to stovepipe-hatted Sebastian Horsley, Soho’s decadents and dandies have proven an entertaining if somewhat trying tribe. Many were far less interesting than their own egos would have them believe, as you’ll know if you ever visited Soho’s notorious Colony Room, a bear pit of strawberry-nosed drunks bellowing witlessly at one another.

How to perplex a moviegoer in the game of the name

Ever found yourself confused between Crash and Crash? It's hardly surprising. Leigh Singer wonders who benefits when films are released with overfamiliar titles

Invisible Ink: No 89 - Boileau and Narcejac

Here's an example of two good writers making one brilliant one. Pierre Boileau was born in Paris in 1906, while Pierre Ayraud, aka Thomas Narcejac, arrived two years later in Rochefort-Sur-Mer.

Prom 38: BBC Concerto Orchestra / Lockhart, Royal Albert Hall

Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the shower… the sound of those slicing, dicing, violin glissandi – halfway between screams and flashes of cold steel – sent ripples of recognition and nervous laughter through the Albert Hall and a vision of Janet Leigh caught in her Edvard Munch moment.

True fans know the score on cinematic composers

Writers of film music are unjustly ignored, says Jessica Duchen, ahead of a Proms celebration of their work

Lost Hitchcock film to be given Hollywood premiere in New Zealand archive

Thirty years after his death, a film by Sir Alfred Hitchcock will once more enjoy a Hollywood premiere after a copy of what is believed to be the earliest surviving film from his back catalogue was found in New Zealand.

Geoffrey Macnab: It's already more hyped than it was first time around

The White Shadow (1924), the newly discovered lost Alfred Hitchcock movie, certainly wasn't one of the high points in his early career. "The film was a total failure," writes Donald Spoto in his Hitchcock biography. "A box-office disaster," agrees rival biographer John Russell Taylor.

Googie Withers, star of 'Within These Walls', dies aged 94

Googie Withers, best known for her role in Alfred Hitchcock's railway thriller The Lady Vanishes, has died in Australia, aged 94.

Pat Jackson: Director who learnt his trade on 'Night Mail' and went on to make one of the finest wartime films

The death of the film director Pat Jackson breaks the last link with the pioneer British documentary movement of the 1930s, and with its masterpiece Night Mail (1936), on which he worked as a youthful apprentice.

TV credit where credits are due

With ‘Dexter’ and ‘Mad Men’ leading the way, TV title sequences are outdoing their film forebears. Gerard Gilbert celebrates the rebirth of an art form

Betty, supervillains and me: January Jones on life after Mad Men

She became a cultural icon as the prim Betty Draper in 'Mad Men', but January Jones is about to shed her conservative image as the mini-skirted villain Emma Frost in the latest 'X-Men' movie. Whatever would Don say?

Celebrate Father's Day with The 39 Steps - bring your dad for free!

The 39 Steps is the hilarious comedy based on the 1935 Hitchcock spy film with four actors playing a minimum of ONE HUNDRED and ‘39’ roles.

Julia's Eyes (15)

Starring: Belé* Rueda Lluís Homar, Pablo Derqui

Invisible Ink: No 77 - Charlotte Armstrong

Charlotte Armstrong was born in the iron-mining territory of Vulcan, Michigan, in 1905, and worked in the classified ads department of The New York Times before hitting her stride as a playwright and mystery writer. She adopted a second identity, Jo Valentine, and produced some 33 novels, hardly any of which are now in print.

Nightmare Movies, By Kim Newman

Why would anyone want to watch a film in which a character is bloodily eviscerated? Or undergoes a gruesome metamorphosis into something unspeakable? Or returns from the grave in a state of decay? Kim Newman has the answers to all these questions, and in Nightmare Movies does his damndest to persuade the reader that not only is the horror film an Aristotelian catharsis but also the hi-tech end product of a respectable literary trend that stretches back for centuries. It is inevitable, perhaps, that the book will be consumed by the converted. That's a shame, as it's hard to think of a more persuasive advocate for this much-despised art form - always a safe target when politicians realise that column inches are always guaranteed by an attempt to locate the ills of society in violent movies.

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