Arts and Entertainment

From garrulous, gangrenous Jeffrey Bernard to stovepipe-hatted Sebastian Horsley, Soho’s decadents and dandies have proven an entertaining if somewhat trying tribe. Many were far less interesting than their own egos would have them believe, as you’ll know if you ever visited Soho’s notorious Colony Room, a bear pit of strawberry-nosed drunks bellowing witlessly at one another.

Siobhan Davies Dance, South London Gallery/Siobhan Davies Studios, London

ROTOR, the latest project from choreographer Siobhan Davies, uses dance as a prompt for other artists. Davies has commissioned a range of works, from performance pieces to sculptures, all drawing on her latest dance work. I liked Sam Collins's video installation, and wanted to steal Ben Tyers's gorgeous sculpture, but most of these works are lightweight.

Observations: The sound of silents

Alfred Hitchcock's close collaborations with soundtrack composers are the stuff of movie legend, but the accompaniment to one of his early works is shrouded in mystery.

Claude Chabrol

New Wave director known for his menacing thrillers set in bourgeois milieux

A cinema of space oddities

Great movies don't need to span the globe. Kaleem Aftab looks at how films from Rear Window to the new Sundance hit Buried have taken inspiration from the limitations of one location

Dom Joly: I am the victim of a dastardly art heist

I used to love Belgium, the nation about which General De Gaulle once snorted, "Two provinces don't make a country." So many of my passions – Tintin, Jacques Brel, frites with mayonnaise – come from there. Last week, however, my love for the Flems and Walloons was severely tested.

Robert F Boyle: Oscar-winning art director who created some of Hitchcock's most memorable settings

Robert Boyle was an Oscar-winning art director whose early architectural training was instrumental in his success.

Jeanloup Sieff's iconic images go under the hammer

A collection of work by iconic fashion photographer Jeanloup Sieff, including a photograph of Alfred Hitchcock posing as a zombie with model Ina Balke during filming for 'Psycho', is due to go under the hammer at Christie's Paris auction house today.

Jeanloup Sieff - Iconic photographs go under the hammer

A collection of work by fashion photographer Jeanloup Sieff, including a photograph of Alfred Hitchcock posing as a zombie with model Ina Balke on the set of Psycho, is under the hammer at Christie's in Paris today.

They made the critics scream, but now these films are classics

Fifty years ago both Psycho and Peeping Tom – Michael Powell's masterpiece about a serial killer with a camera – were condemned. Geoffrey Macnab explores how we changed our minds about them, and others

Johan Grimonprez, The Fruitmarket, Edinburgh

Countless airplanes, one after the other, explode on the screen in front of you, on the runway and in the sky, terrifying in their horrifying, graceful demise. How can we understand such footage? What has it done to us? Can artists tell us? You might find some answers to these questions at Edinburgh's consistently excellent Fruitmarket Gallery, in an exhibition devoted to the works of the Belgian anthropologist-turned-film-artist Johan Grimonprez.

Why calls of the wild are the secret of a good horror film

Suspense-building music mimicks sounds of animals in distress

Nicholas Lezard: Honey, the kids must see this film

Sometimes you have to admit that the French do things better than us. The news that their Education Ministry is to put 200 classic films on an online database so that their children can be educated in what they call the Seventh Art should be a rebuke to us.

Birdemic: Schlock horrors that come low on the pecking order

Birdemic, a tribute to The Birds, is the latest in a long line of terrible Alfred Hitchcock remakes. Why does the master of suspense inspire so many turkeys, wonders Francesca Steele

Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff (NC)

This is a timely tribute to a great technician of movie-making, Jack Cardiff, who died last month, aged 94.

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