News Kanye West is apparently shelling out a mammoth $250,000 in order to ensure his fiancée Kim Kardashian looks camera-ready at all times.

The eye-watering amount the rapper is shelling out for his fiancée to appear camera-ready at his concerts

Film: Above it all

A new film captures the strange mystique of Nico, the accidental icon. By Louise Gray

Letter: Warhol censored

Sir: I know Britain is very skilled at developing collective amnesia over its own reactionary history and cultural cowardice, but any retrospective assessment of the films made by Andy Warhol and Paul Morrissey (12 September) should have pointed out that nearly all the titles mentioned were, when they were first made, either banned from public exhibition in this country or shown only in cut versions.

So what exactly did Andy do?

Andy Warhol's films of people (and buildings) doing their own thing got the Sixties art world talking. Some of the later works are even watchable - thanks mainly to his director, Paul Morrissey. By Ryan Gilbey

Bowie stages artful return

What a strange, time warp year it is turning out to be: new albums from the Beatles and Queen, feature performances from dead artists; the Rolling Stones are on tour. And last night one of the most delightful surprises of all - David Bowie launched his stage renaissance with his first British concert in five years.

Inflammatory material

When the supposed New Queer Cinema was trumpeted from the rooftops a few years back, how were we to know that it was just the latest in a procession of transparent and tenuous media inventions? We thought it was a good thing, right? Todd Haynes, Gregg Araki, Tom Kalin - whether or not you liked the films (and Swoon is a tough one to defend three years on), you couldn't have argued with what those pictures promised.

TELEVISION / York on Ads: Don't tell me what it is - I'll buy it anyway: No 45: H&M Impulse

ANDY WARHOL used to do Andy things. Here comes Andy Ad. It's like A Chorus Line, like Fame: a line-up of New York hopefuls pitching for me - self-expression and redemption on film.

BOOK REVIEW / Royalties for a naked lunch: 'The Good Ship Venus: The Erotic Voyage of the Olympia Press' - John de St Jorre: Hutchinson, 20 pounds

WHAT kind of man would publish titles like White Thighs, Bottoms Up, The Loins of Amon, The Whipping Club or Heaven, Hell and the Whore? Oddly enough, the kind of man who also published Samuel Beckett, Lawrence Durrell, Jean Genet, Henry Miller, Vladimir Nabokov and J P Donleavy.

The Proms / John Tavener

APOCALYPSE now, but what of then? The old John Tavener re- emerged this week from the purple haze of Sixties pop culture. A timely reminder that he was a lot more fun before sanctification. He's never forsaken the clothes, of course, but pieces like In Alium, his 1968 Prom commission, belong exclusively to a time when religion was love and peace, a flower-child, a joss-stick, a light-show, and a Hammond organ. In Alium is all of these things. Only the light-show comes extra.

Edinburgh Festival / Day 8: Side View

JAMES HOLMES on performing without his anorak, indeed without any clothes at all, in Gee Wow] The Life and Times of Clive Neon: Warhol Superstar . . .

Art Market: Warhol: Famous for dollars 500m: Seven years after his death, Andy Warhol's work is still controversial. Valuation of his estate is the subject of a bitter legal drama which has kept the New York art world enthralled, writes Geraldine Norman

WHEN Andy Warhol died on 22 February 1987, he left 4,118 paintings, 5,103 drawings, 19,086 prints and 66,512 photographs, besides some very valuable real estate and cupboards overflowing with antiques and junk.

Captain Moonlight: Warhol soup

TOUCHING, really. Visitors to the grave of Andy Warhol have taken to leaving tins of Campbell's soup on it. Unopened. One of Warhol's brothers has to keep clearing them away. He should leave them. Perhaps they could be stacked into a giant pyramid, like they have in supermarkets. I think Andy would have liked it that way.

BOOK REVIEW / Bookshop Window: My year - Roald Dahl, illustrated by Quentin Blake: Cape, pounds 8.99

What an odd book: a confessional journal for children. It's hard to imagine anyone but Dahl being able to hold anyone's youthful interest for long enough, but this diary is a remarkable document. It begins by exploring the contents of the author's tabletop - a baby seal carved out of whalebone, a steel hip, a piece of ambergris - and ends with Dahl wishing his readership 'a lovely Christmas and a super holiday'. In between is surprisingly routine treasury of garden lore: moles are nice because they eat 'all the horrid centipedes'; cuckoos are nasty because they are lazy. You keep waiting for a twist - the cuckoo hatches out an alligator, perhaps - but the benign tone rarely slackens. It's like a nature diary by Andy Warhol - what in other hands might be slight seems, in Dahl's hands, freakish and astonishing.

ROCK / The crowd goes bananas: Here we go again: Giles Smith met the members of the Velvet Underground and watched their first show for 25 years

At the end of the Velvet Underground's show in Edinburgh, after the encores ('Waiting for the Man' and 'Heroin'), the audience thunders its approval and the band, none of whom are wearing shades, gathers stage-centre. John Cale gives Lou Reed an awkward, one-armed hug. Sterling Morrison pats Maureen Tucker on the head. Everybody bows. They did it: an entire show without splitting up.

The Broader Picture: Slovakia adores its simple saint

'I come from nowhere,' Andy Warhol once said. He came from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. But his family came from a little village in the Carpathians, in what is now - as from this year - the new nation of Slovakia. In the years since Warhol's death in 1987, a new image of the all-American pop-artist has been emerging, too, returning him to his Slovakian roots. As the art historian John Richardson suggests, the attitude of wide-eyed detachment which Warhol turned on the surfaces of the Western media-world may have had deeper, ancestral origins: 'In his impregnable innocence and humility, Andy always struck me as a yurodstvo - one of those saintly simpletons who haunt Russian and Slavic villages, such as Mikova in Ruthenia, whence the Warhols stemmed.' And not far from there, on the Slovakian- Polish border, there's now a Warhol museum.

Garden Update: Blooming elsewhere

FLORA Photographica, the brilliant exhibition of flower photographs selected by the Canadian photo-historian William Ewing, moves today to the Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh, where it will be on show until 22 November. Among the early works are some of Fox Talbot's experimental images of leaves and flowers. There is also a cyanotype by Anna Atkins, one of the first women to explore this new art form. Marilyn Monroe is there too, clasping roses to her breasts. Andy Warhol dallies with iris. Admission pounds 2.
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