Arts and Entertainment
 

There were fast and furious scenes in the fictional London Borough of Walford yesterday as EastEnders stars put the pedal to the metal while shooting the soap's most explosive stunt ever.

Less-than-arresting language short on old gags but long on verbiage: The new form of words is a confused and repetitious tiptoe through legal niceties, Tom Sutcliffe believes

THE NEW 60-word caution announced by Michael Howard on Thursday may well be risible but it is far from being a joking matter - you might even view it as the final blow to a venerable tradition of British comedy. Lawyers, unlike comedians, do not much care for double entendres. Indeed, those who have drafted this new warning have been so assiduous in avoiding ambiguity that the likely result is no entendres at all, clarity drowning in an explanatory tangle of tenses and conditionals.

How We Met: Bill Bryden and Angela Douglas

Scottish-born director and playwright Bill Bryden, 52, has won many awards for his work in television (including Tutti Frutti), theatre and opera. His new play, The Big Picnic, opens next month in Govan, Strathclyde. Divorced, with two adult children, he lives in London with Angela Douglas.

Obituary: Terry Scott

Owen John Scott (Terry Scott), actor: born Watford, Hertfordshire 4 May 1927; married 1949 Mary Howard (one son deceased; marriage dissolved), 1957 Margaret Peden (four daughters); died Godalming, Surrey 26 July 1994.

Under the weather: Notoriously difficult, Pericles has claimed another victim. Paul Taylor reviews Phyllida Lloyd's new production for the National Theatre

Many of the most critical moments in Shakespeare's Pericles take place on board ship. There's a difference, though, between having a powerful marine element, such as this play has, and being positively all at sea, like Phyllida Lloyd's new Olivier production. Lavish, restlessly eclectic and stubbornly unaffecting, it pursues the hero on his episodic wanderings, equipped with every technological resource save a compass.

TELEVISION / Nostalgia simply ain't what it used to be

DOES ANYONE have a clue what Danny Baker's on? Apart from a salary comparable to what Millwall got for Tony Cascarino, that is. You consume the unique contributions of the BBC's Golden Verbals to our national culture, and have to assume that he has access to some wonder-drug, like the one in Brave New World, that makes everything look as cheerful as it is cheap.

Knight basks in the media glow as drama enters its final act: Fugitive refused bail on charges relating to pounds 6m robbery. Ian MacKinnon reports

THE APPEARANCE at Bow Street magistrates' court in London yesterday of Ronnie Knight - former fugitive on the Costa del Sol, former husband of the Carry On star Barbara Windsor - after 11 years on the run, appeared to herald the final act of one of the most enduring tabloid sagas.

Opinions: Should mutton dress as lamb?

KATHY LETTE, writer: The schoolgirl fantasy has passed its amuse-by date. Having been one myself, I can reveal that the reality is not the budding breasted nubile nymph, but padded trainer bras and sheets smeared in acne lotion.

Obituary: Kenneth Connor

Kenneth Connor, actor: born London 6 June 1916; MBE 1991; married (one son); died Harrow, Middlesex 28 November 1993.

'Carry On' star dies

The comedy actor Kenneth Connor, 74, has died of cancer at his home in Harrow, north-west London. Mr Connor will be best remembered for his roles in the 'Carry On' films, but more recently was known as the amorous undertaker Alphonse in BBC 1's 'Allo 'Allo.

Obituary: Gerald Thomas

Gerald Thomas, film director: born Hull 10 December 1920; married (three daughters); died Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire 9 November 1993.

Opinions: Do you prefer a pub or a wine bar?

JEFFREY BERNARD, journalist: I prefer pubs. Wine bars play the bloody Four Seasons in the background all day long and the people who go to them are awful - advertising people, producers of TV commercials. Pubs have a better mix of people and they are for drinking in, not sitting around talking business.

BOOK REVIEW / Crying all the way to the Barclays: 'The Kenneth Williams Diaries' - ed Russell Davies: HarperCollins, 20 pounds

KENNETH WILLIAMS said of Russell Davies, whom he never met: 'Sounds like a nasty piece of work'. In fact, he could not have wished for a better editor. This book is perfectly produced, with an informative introduction and, as far as I can see, no typographical errors at all. Williams would have approved: he cared passionately about such things.

Obituary: Bernard Bresslaw

Bernard Bresslaw, actor: born London 25 February 1934; married (three sons); died London 11 June 1993.

Actor Bernard Bresslaw dies

BERNARD Bresslaw, the comic actor best known for his roles in the Carry On series of films, died last night an hour before he was due to appear as Grumio in The Taming of the Shrew in London, writes Steve Boggan.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
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The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
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Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
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Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

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A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
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Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
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These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

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A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

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A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
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Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project