Sport Hail Cesar: Azpilicueta has started 14 of Chelsea’s last 16 games, adding an understated solidity to the team’s defence

Full-back tells Miguel Delaney how he worked on his strength and won over Jose Mourinho by putting ‘the team first, second and third’

Tennis: Henman rallies from base line

Andrew Longmore finds Britain's summer matinee idol at a loss for the first time

Tennis: Ivanisevic and Kafelnikov not suited to change of scenery

Good players might not become bad players overnight, but strange form fluctuations do seem to take place when they are sleeping, or at least trying to sleep, while in transit from one tournament to another. There are times when last week's winners become this week's no-hopers.

Call me an adultescent, if you wish, but I'm stuck on popular culture

It is not every day that one is stopped in one's tracks by a gang of lexicographers. But the people who edit Oxford Dictionaries have sent out a list of newly minted words that have appeared in the last year or so. And one's eye falls with horror on the portmanteau term "adultescent", defined as "35-45-year-olds with interests typically associated with youth culture". The word is new to me, but the sentiment is something I'm accused of all the time. Nobody actually says "Stop that, you ridiculous adultescent" - they simply cock an eyebrow when you reveal that you know the names (and the individual colours and apparent gender allocation) of all the repellent Teletubbies, you can differentiate between Natalie and Nicola in the All Saints girl pop group, you wear a tie (a nephew's Christmas present) emblazoned with the cartoon features of Homer Simpson, and you spend every Friday evening popping ecstasy tablets at the Brixton Fridge (only kidding). You can explain that it's simply a spillover of being a parent. But the pressure of one's post-40 peer group to make you abandon any desire to be au courant with popular culture just gets louder. Grow up, they say. Leave it alone, the club listings and the MTV videos and the hopelessness of even trying to stand up in rollerblade boots, let alone cruise down the middle of the Talgarth Road in the things. A generation of fortysomething friends now proudly admits they can't remember the last time they ordered a hamburger, stayed up until the dawn or bought a CD that wasn't a retread of an old favourite on vinyl disc (or, in some cases, shellac).

According to the boffins, it shouldn't have left the ground

Awareness of Britain's bat population is very much improved. But, writes Daniel Butler, there's still much to learn about these strangest of mammals.

Government put its weight behind hiring British videos

The Government yesterday launched a new drive to persuade customers in video shops to buy or hire British films in preference to Hollywood blockbusters.

The Houses can sell a home

When it comes to selling in the Camberwell/ Brixton area, a brochure with a picture of the Houses of Parliament works a dream. A house owner having enormous difficulty in selling her quiet family house in the same neck of the woods off Myatt's Fields, a lovely but little-known park, was amazed at the success of St Gabriel's Manors advertising campaign.

Something in the air for young birdwatchers

More than 90 countries are this weekend participating in the 1997 World Birdwatch.

Preview: Play monopoly

If you can keep out of jail long enough, why not take a chance and lend your support to The Great Monopoly Challenge which takes place around the capital today. The event, organised by The Royal British Legion to raise money for more than 50 charities, kicks off at 9.30am at King's Cross and Liverpool Street stations. Teams will collect a game card and, using only public transport, visit all the streets and sites on the Monopoly board in whatever order they wish and in the fastest possible time. The day climaxes in Battersea Park at 6 o'clock with prize-giving, live music and fireworks.

Comment: Receptionists and other pests

It may be the largest collection of living things on the planet, but some are more welcome at Kew than others. Or so I found last week at the Royal Botanical Gardens, which houses more than one in every eight of all the world's flowering plants.

Matters of the flesh

What to do with the cuddly toys? The girls undertook a census of them last week and discovered they had 73. Unfortunately they have given them all names, dates of birth and occupations so the conventional method of keeping numbers down - a midnight cull - is no longer possible. What was once an anonymous, lime-green mutant rabbit languishing at the bottom of the dirty clothes basket is now a shop assistant called Sally whose birthday must be celebrated tomorrow. Plan B was to persuade the children to take some to Kensington Palace as a tribute to Diana, something several hundred other parents have obviously thought of before me - but I could not live with the thought that some poor East European tourist might be sent to prison for three years for succumbing to the plastic, one-eyed gaze of a win-a-prize-every-time teddy bear. On the other hand, maybe it's not such a bad idea to make adult possession of cuddly toys a criminal offence, particularly when combined with broderie anglaise heart-shaped cushions on the bed.

Shore things

Driftwood mirror, pounds 69, driftwood frame, pounds 28.95, galvanised bucket, pounds 4.75, scented wooden seashore shapes, from pounds 2.50, all from Liberty, Regent Street, London W1, 0171 734 1234

BEACH VOLLEYBALL: Swimming against the tide

Nick Halling reports from Bournemouth on the difficulty facing a demanding sport in establishing itself in Britain despite its Olympic status and worldwide popularity

Hare today, gone tomorrow?

One of Britain's great survivors is now under threat, writes Daniel Butler

Southern revival

Focus on London: prices are rising rapidly south of the Thames

Shopping list: Stone studded brilliance

Coffee table by Tom Baker, pounds 345, available to order from ORE, 563 Battersea Park Road, London SW11. Enquiries: 0171 801 0919
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Turkey-Kurdish conflict: Obama's deal with Ankara is a betrayal of Syrian Kurds and may not even weaken Isis

US betrayal of old ally brings limited reward

Since the accord, the Turks have only waged war on Kurds while no US bomber has used Incirlik airbase, says Patrick Cockburn
VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but doubts linger over security

'A gift from Egypt to the rest of the world'

VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but is it really needed?
Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, applauds a man who clearly has more important things on his mind
The male menopause and intimations of mortality

Aches, pains and an inkling of mortality

So the male menopause is real, they say, but what would the Victorians, 'old' at 30, think of that, asks DJ Taylor
Man Booker Prize 2015: Anna Smaill - How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?

'How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?'

Man Booker Prize nominee Anna Smaill on the rise of Kiwi lit
Bettany Hughes interview: The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems

Bettany Hughes interview

The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems
Art of the state: Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China

Art of the state

Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China
Mildreds and Vanilla Black have given vegetarian food a makeover in new cookbooks

Vegetarian food gets a makeover

Long-time vegetarian Holly Williams tries to recreate some of the inventive recipes in Mildreds and Vanilla Black's new cookbooks
The haunting of Shirley Jackson: Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?

The haunting of Shirley Jackson

Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?
Bill Granger recipes: Heading off on holiday? Try out our chef's seaside-inspired dishes...

Bill Granger's seaside-inspired recipes

These dishes are so easy to make, our chef is almost embarrassed to call them recipes
Ashes 2015: Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

A woefully out-of-form Michael Clarke embodies his team's fragile Ashes campaign, says Michael Calvin
Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza

Andrew Grice: Inside Westminster

Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza
HMS Victory: The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

Exclusive: David Keys reveals the research that finally explains why HMS Victory went down with the loss of 1,100 lives
Survivors of the Nagasaki atomic bomb attack: Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism

'I saw people so injured you couldn't tell if they were dead or alive'

Nagasaki survivors on why Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism
Jon Stewart: The voice of Democrats who felt Obama had failed to deliver on his 'Yes We Can' slogan, and the voter he tried hardest to keep onside

The voter Obama tried hardest to keep onside

Outgoing The Daily Show host, Jon Stewart, became the voice of Democrats who felt the President had failed to deliver on his ‘Yes We Can’ slogan. Tim Walker charts the ups and downs of their 10-year relationship on screen