News A Muslim woman, who cannot be named for legal reasons, arrives at Blackfriars Crown Court in London where a judge has ruled that she will be allowed to stand trial while wearing a full-face veil but must remove it while giving evidence

Home Secretary's comments come after judge rules that woman must remove full-face veil to give evidence during trial

Exhumed again: the macabre suicide riddle of God's Banker to be dug up again

EVEN IN death there is, for some, no rest. Sixteen years have passed since that damp June morning when Leonid Brezhnev still ruled the Soviet Union, Britain had just won the Falklands conflict and the body of Roberto Calvi was found hanging from the scaffolding beneath a bridge across the river Thames. Today, that same corpse - or at least the bones and husk, which are most likely all that remain - will be exhumed, yet again, from the cemetery at Drezzo in northern Italy where he was buried in November 1982. Yet another autopsy - the fourth in all - will be conducted. Those whose legacies are great unsolved criminal mysteries must forego the dignity of peace in death.

spectacle thames festival

The highlight of last year's Thames Festival was the spectacular high-wire walk across the dark waters of London. This year's event is more of a collective effort. It opens at dusk on Sunday with a magical riverbank procession in which a cast of thousands will be parading along the riverbank - giant illuminated sculptures (above), bright-shining carnival costumes and thousands of flaming torches and hand-held lanterns will bathe the city in a firey glow. The public are encouraged to bring their own torches and add their own light to the burning throng as it heads south across the river at Blackfriars Bridge. On the water itself, a flotilla of illuminated rivercraft and a choreographed speed-boat display will be augmented by an extravagant display of pyrotechnics while a floating stage booms live music into the night air. Finally, in case you get peckish en route, a colourful night market will sell snacks with a fishy theme, including barbecued trout.

Books: No progress for this rake

Casanova

Architecture: Wheeling and dealing

The South Bank looks set to become

Cafe Society: Come as you wannabe

If your expense account won't stretch to the Oxo Tower Restaurant, why not try the Bistrot 2 Riverside nestled beneath it? Pretty staff, tasty dishes, clean and tidy, with views to die for. Oh, and is that Patsy Kensit over there?

`I'm not undressing for you'

The Wrong Correspondent

People & Business: A night at the opera and a 30p fine at the Bank

Howard Davies, who left the Bank of England yesterday to become boss of super-SIB, tells me he was unaware that it was within the Bank's powers to impose fines until he himself fell victim to a levy from the Old Lady.

A red rose blooms in Blackfriars

Under it's new proprietor, the prominent Labour peer Lord Hollick, 'The Express' is gradually moving towards the centre. Editor Richard Addis explains why

Labour peer Rogers sets out his vision for an urban revolution

The architect Richard Rogers used his maiden speech in the House of Lords to spell out a plan for revitalising and humanising Britain's cities.

God's Banker: 'He was given Mafia money and he made poor use of it'

For 15 years the mystery of Roberto Calvi's death has been left spectacularly hanging, in much the same way that the body of the Italian banker was found dangling from a piece of scaffolding beneath Blackfriars Bridge in London on the morning of June 18, 1982.

The poison tart

UNNATURAL MURDER by Anne Somerset Weidenfeld pounds 20

Room for a view

Lofty ideals

Travel: 35,000 ghosts waiting just around that corner

THE SUNDAY WALK: An army of spectres haunts the labyrinthine heart of the old City of London, but you need a spirit guide to introduce them to you

CURTAIN CALLS: THEATRE

Showstopper

Big firms cut back donations to Tories

Large companies are increasingly refusing to donate money to the Conservative Party but the shortfall is being made up by smaller firms whose donations are not so open to public scrutiny.
News
The Banksy image in Folkestone before it was vandalised
people
Life and Style
tech

Sales of the tablet are set to fall again, say analysts

Sport
football West Brom vs Man Utd match report: Blind grabs point, but away form a problem for Van Gaal
Arts and Entertainment
Gotham is coming to UK shores this autumn
tvGotham, episode 2, review
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Arts and Entertainment
Bloom Time: Mira Sorvino
tvMira Sorvino on leaving movie roles for 'The Intruders'
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First woman: Valentina Tereshkova
peopleNASA guinea pig Kate Greene thinks it might fly
News
Brian Harvey turned up at Downing Street today demanding to speak to the Prime Minister
news

Met Police confirm there was a 'minor disturbance' and that no-one was arrested

Arts and Entertainment
George Lucas poses with a group of Star Wars-inspired Disney characters at Disney's Hollywood Studios in 2010
films

George Lucas criticises the major Hollywood film studios

Voices
Chris Grayling, Justice Secretary: 'There are pressures which we are facing but there is not a crisis'
voices

Does Chris Grayling realise what a vague concept he is dealing with?

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Prices correct as of 17 October 2014
Two super-sized ships have cruised into British waters, but how big can these behemoths get?

Super-sized ships: How big can they get?

Two of the largest vessels in the world cruised into UK waters last week
British doctors on brink of 'cure' for paralysis with spinal cord treatment

British doctors on brink of cure for paralysis

Sufferers can now be offered the possibility of cure thanks to a revolutionary implant of regenerative cells
Ranked seventh in world’s best tourist cities - not London, or Edinburgh, but Salisbury

Salisbury ranked seventh in world’s best tourist cities

The city is home to one of the four surviving copies of the Magna Carta, along with the world’s oldest mechanical clock
Let's talk about loss

We need to talk about loss

Secrecy and silence surround stillbirth
Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Women may be better suited to space travel than men are
Oscar Pistorius sentencing: The athlete's wealth and notoriety have provoked a long overdue debate on South African prisons

'They poured water on, then electrified me...'

If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why
How to dress with authority: Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear

How to dress with authority

Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear
New book on Joy Division's Ian Curtis sheds new light on the life of the late singer

New book on Ian Curtis sheds fresh light on the life of the late singer

'Joy Division were making art... Ian was for real' says author Jon Savage
Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

The Bafta-winner talks Hollywood, being branded a psycho, and how Barbra Streisand is his true inspiration
Tim Minchin, interview: The musician, comedian and world's favourite ginger is on scorching form

Tim Minchin interview

For a no-holds-barred comedian who is scathing about woolly thinking and oppressive religiosity, he is surprisingly gentle in person
Boris Johnson's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Boris's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Many of us Brits still disapprove of conspicuous consumption – it's the way we were raised, says DJ Taylor
Ash frontman Tim Wheeler reveals how he came to terms with his father's dementia

Tim Wheeler: Alzheimer's, memories and my dad

Wheeler's dad suffered from Alzheimer's for three years. When he died, there was only one way the Ash frontman knew how to respond: with a heartfelt solo album