Arts and Entertainment

Does success in one genre guarantee it in another?

Sleigh Bells
Bombay Bicycle Club

It's time for Britpop's Bright Young Things to take centre stage

New bands should take top billing at the big festivals, says Emily Mackay

Ticket sales fall as music festivals hit a flat note

Vince Power's Music Festivals group yesterday warned that economic woes are hitting sales at its Hop Farm Music Festival in Kent and its Benicassim event in Spain.

Music Festivals is hit by ticket sales drag

Vince Power's Music Festivals group yesterday warned that economic woes are hitting sales at its Hop Farm Music Festival in Kent and its Benicassim event in Spain.

Leading figures pay tribute to journalist Marie Colvin at memorial service

Leading figures from the worlds of media, politics, and the arts gathered to pay emotional tribute to "bravest of the brave" war correspondent Marie Colvin.

The Saturday Quiz answers

1. Benidorm

Oh, Sister

Oh, Sister: 'I’m finally writing songs that I’m happy with'

Do we need another female singer-songwriter? Feist; Laura Marling; the now ubiquitous Lana Del Rey: the internet being what it is, we can find what we are looking for with the click of a button. 

Album: The Chieftains, Voice of Ages (Decca)

To commemorate their 50th anniversary, The Chieftains here collaborate with young luminaries of various roots-rock strains, from bluegrass virtuosi the Punch Brothers to retro-minstrels the Carolina Chocolate Drops.

Illumination: David Gascoyne

Night Thoughts: The Surreal Life of the Poet David Gascoyne, By Robert Fraser

Many know about the death by drowning of WS Gilbert; others are aware that in 1933 Ernest Hemingway, incensed by a review, trashed the Paris bookshop in which he read it. Few could point to these incidents' one degree of separation. Such surprises regularly punctuate the soberly engrossing chronicle which Robert Fraser has created around the life of a poet whose modest fame has burned steadily, almost brightly, since his Thirties emergence as a teenage prodigy.

The Light of Amsterdam, By David Park

Love is "the price that had to be paid for bringing a child into the world," according to one character in David Park's new novel. Here, love is not an unalloyed joy, or a great benefit which happens to carry baggage. It is indivisible, negative as well as positive. Parents suffer unrequited love for their children, a wife tortures herself with fear of her husband's adultery, and a single mother finds that the past is not dead; it is not even past. Like Park's earlier novels The Big Snow and The Truth Commissioner, The Light of Amsterdam tells separate stories which touch and cross. Alan, Karen and Marion don't know one another, though their names seem to chime along with their stories. They are all middle-aged, living in Belfast, and travelling to Amsterdam in December 2005.

Frank Turner, Wembley Arena

Frank Turner is a former hardcore Punkster who fronted band Million Dead in the early noughties. But his much gentler, quintessentially English folk-influenced solo material has earned him enough fans to sell-out a 12,000-capacity Wembley Arena.

Album: Bonnie Raitt, Slipstream (Redwing/Proper)

On her first album in seven years, Bonnie Raitt divides her efforts between fiery slide-guitar blues recorded with her own band, and a handful of tracks recorded with producer Joe Henry's bespoke band of specialist players including expressive drummer Jay Bellerose and omni-talented guitarist Bill Frisell.

The Saturday Quiz answers

1. "Home-Thoughts, From Abroad", by Robert Browning.

Cultural Life: A. L. Kennedy, novelist

Books I've just finished Russell Banks's Lost Memory Of Skin, which has its flaws, but the man can really write and he's passionate about social justice in America. He chose his country's most marginalised group [sex offenders] as his focus and continued with courage, for which he has my thanks. I've also been reading Daniel Simpson's A Rough Guide to the Dark Side – it's all about why he left The New York Times and the jaw-dropping realities of modern journalism. Great, funny, passionate stuff.

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