Arts and Entertainment

Does success in one genre guarantee it in another?

Barb Jungr Sings Dylan, Vortex, London

Bob Dylan's most revolutionary impact on songwriting was his personal presence in his work, autobiographical authenticity not discernible in, say, Cole Porter. British jazz singer Barb Jungr's performance tonight, accompanied by pianist Simon Wallace, is the strongest proof I've heard that his songbook will outlive him. Even if Dylan's records were melted down tomorrow, the restless vitality she finds in their content will survive.

Bob Dylan and Jack White's Hank Williams tribute

Bob Dylan, Jack White and Norah Jones have recorded previously unreleased Hank Williams songs.

Dylan Jones: 'The lack of music on television and the small size of CDs makes it hard for bands to market their image'

Twin Atlantic's "Free" is the impassioned sound of young Glasgow – fast, furious and repeatedly championed by Kerrang! magazine. The band have been around since 2007, playing festivals, getting sticky on YouTube, touring the US, and making the sort of baby pop metal that goes down well at uni. But until "Free" (the title track of their first proper album, two years on from the critically acclaimed mini-album Vivarium) they had yet to come up with a hook that might hint at immortality. As they use so much that has gone before them (their line-up, the genre, the form itself), these days groups like this – and it has to be said that there are many groups like this – find it difficult to get the traction they need.

Album: Tara Nevins, Wood and Stone (Sugar Hill)

A member of roots-music group Donna the Buffalo for 20 years, the fiddler/accordionist Tara Nevins chose former Dylan sideman Larry Campbell to produce her first solo outing in over a decade.

Dylan Jones: 'Bob Dylan once kicked Phil Ochs out of his car saying, 'You’re not a folk singer, you're a journalist'

Barack Obama has never spoken of his fondness for the late Phil Ochs, and it is completely possible that he has never heard of him. One of America's foremost protest singers, he described himself as a "left social democrat", and during the Sixties became a staple at civil rights rallies, student sit-ins, and anti-Vietnam marches.

Feis Festival, Finsbury Park, London

Homesick blues cured for one night

Summertime - and the new bands are hot

So many festivals and so many bands. Elisa Bray picks the best rising acts – and highlights the unmissable big names

Album: Robert Randolph and the Family Band, We Walk This Road (Dare)

Seeking to expand his musical outlook beyond his purely gospel influences, "sacred steel" guitarist Robert Randolph hooked up with producer T-Bone Burnett, and found himself dropping $5,000 on iTunes in 18 months, catching up on things he'd never encountered (such as Chess Records).

Dylan Jones:'Two Door Cinema Club look not unlike any other floppy-fringed boy band of the past 30 years'

If you see their jaunty pop promos – old-fashioned, so weirdly refreshing – or ever watch them live, County Down band Two Door Cinema Club (so named when guitarist Sam Halliday mispronounced the name of the local Bangor cinema, Tudor Cinema) sort of crouch down, curling over their instruments, as though they've possibly only just learnt to play them – carefully watching their fingers crawl up and down the fretboard, not entirely sure where they're going to end up. This is engaging, and makes them appear even younger than they are, the best boys in their class, beavering away under an imaginary glass ceiling, effervescent and jangly in equal measure. In preppy jumpers, plimsoles and sports jackets, with floppy fringes and smiles, they look not unlike Haircut 100, Orange Juice, or any other floppy-fringed boy band of the past 30 years.

Thea Gilmore, Union Chapel, London

A one-off event paying tribute to Dylan's 70th birthday, Thea Gilmore's concert showcased her own re-recording of his John Wesley Harding album, interspersed with one or two musical and poetic asides.

Dylan Jones: 'In the Seventies, every band who wanted to leave an impression went to the Cambridge pub in the West End'

The Cambridge is still there, but it isn't the same. How could it be? The Cambridge pub sits on the north-west corner of Cambridge Circus in London's West End – in 1977, just 100 yards from the Marquee, 100 yards from the 100 Club, and only 50 yards from Central Saint Martins School of Art. From 1976 to 1980, the Cambridge was the most important pub in Soho, and every band who wanted to leave an impression usually ended up there, pumping money into the jukebox, drinking bottles of Pils, and throwing shapes in their leather jackets.

Album: Barb Jungr, Man in the Long Black Coat (Linn)

A compilation of Dylan covers from various stages of her career, freshened up with four new recordings, Man in the Long Black Coat mines Barb Jungr's fascination with the septuagenarian troubadour with variable results.

Interview reveals Dylan was suicidal and a heroin addict

In a newly-discovered interview recorded at the height of his fame, folk legend Bob Dylan admitted being suicidal and having a heroin addiction.

More man, music, and mystique

The singer's 70th birthday has inspired a fresh collective outpouring from the world's foremost Dylanologists

Bob Dylan 70th Birthday Season, BBC

Many happy returns Bob, love Auntie
News
peopleHowards' Way actress, and former mistress of Jeffrey Archer, was 60
News
Robyn Lawley
people
News
people
Life and Style
lifeDon't get caught up on climaxing
Sport
Usain Bolt confirms he will run in both the heats and the finals of the men's relay at the Commonwealth Games
commonwealth games
Life and Style
Troy Baker and Ashley Johnson voice the show’s heroes
gamingOnce stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover
Voices
voices In defence of the charcoal-furred feline, by Felicity Morse
Arts and Entertainment
Unhappy days: Resistance spy turned Nobel prize winner Samuel Beckett
books
Arts and Entertainment
High-flyer: Chris Pratt in 'Guardians of the Galaxy'
filmThe film is surprisingly witty, but could do with taking itself more seriously, says Geoffrey Macnab
News
people
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices
Could our smartphones soon be diagnosing diseases via Health Kit and Google Fit?

Could smartphones soon be diagnosing diseases?

Health Kit and Google Fit have been described as "the beginning of a health revolution"
Ryanair has turned on the 'charm offensive' but can we learn to love the cut-price carrier again?

Can we learn to love Ryanair again?

Four recent travellers give their verdicts on the carrier's improved customer service
Billionaire founder of Spanx launches range of jeans that offers

Spanx launches range of jeans

The jeans come in two styles, multiple cuts and three washes and will go on sale in the UK in October
10 best over-ear headphones

Aural pleasure: 10 best over-ear headphones

Listen to your favourite tracks with this selection, offering everything from lambskin earmuffs to stainless steel
Commonwealth Games 2014: David Millar ready to serve up gold for his beloved Scotland in the end

Commonwealth Games

David Millar ready to serve up gold for his beloved Scotland in the end
UCI Mountain Bike World Cup 2014: Downhill all the way to the top for the Atherton siblings

UCI Mountain Bike World Cup

Downhill all the way to the top for the Atherton siblings
Save the tiger: The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The big cats kept in captivity to perform for paying audiences and then, when dead, their bodies used to fortify wine
A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery all included in top 50 hidden spots in the UK

A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery

Introducing the top 50 hidden spots in Britain
Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

How a disease that has claimed fewer than 2,000 victims in its history has earned a place in the darkest corner of the public's imagination
Chris Pratt: From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

He was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star