Arts and Entertainment Jane Campion will succeed Steven Spielberg as president of the Cannes jury

The first female director to win the Palme d'Or said she 'can't wait' until May

SITES OF THE WEEK

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Cannes Diary: What a good year for neuroses

CANNES ON its 51st birthday is afflicted by a sense of morning after in the wake of last year's monumental half- century bender. The festival's very poster, butterfly-shaped shards of celluloid flapping through the sky, looks like something advertising a horror flick called Invasion of the Killer Bats - which would be light relief compared to some of the actual fare on view. Drug and alcohol abuse, madness, concentration camps, Stalinist purges: these are the subjects with which film-makers have seen fit to entertain us. Paedophilia and sodomy are the topics of choice (the latter even figures in Ingmar Bergman's new telefilm, In the Presence of a Clown) and there is a whole slew of movies about the end-of-millennium apocalypse. Fortunately - and this must reveal something about the current zeitgeist - a number of them are comedies.

Cannes Diary: Quality assurance in Lebanon

THOSE who think the press can be beastly will have their minds change if they attend the daily press conferences for the stars at the Palais des Festivals. Here, the film critics of the world gather for an orgy of sycophancy.

Cannes Diary: Prestige but few financial rewards

THE FESTIVAL climaxes with the Palme d'Or, one of the most prestigious prizes in world cinema.

Cannes Diary: Aliens and gut reactions

ALONGSIDE the Palme D'Or I would like to see a special award for La Grande Gaffe. The lifetime achievement award for a Cannes Gaffe belongs, of course, to former Conservative arts minister Stephen Dorrell, who came here a couple of years back and praised the then president of the festival jury, the exquisite actress Jeanne Moreau, as "a great Frenchman". He needed several bodyguards when he walked down the Croisette after that.

Cannes Diary: May '68 and life mirrors art

ROMAN POLANSKI is in town and has been reminiscing of his time on the Cannes jury in 1968, a somewhat hairy year in France.

Cannes Diary: In the national interests

TODAY the British pavilion here will stop all film business to show the FA Cup Final to all the temporary ex-pats.

Brits do their gritty bit at glitzy Cannes

ON THE beachfront, in the blazing sun, Emma Thompson was giving interviews, her American publicist resolutely keeping the troublesome British press at bay. Across the Croisette, at Planet Hollywood, the security men were practising their scowls as they prepared for John Travolta's party later this week.

'It's just one long party from beginning to end'

You can go to the Cannes Film Festival and enjoy some of the best drama, comedy and acting without ever seeing a movie. Socialising, hustling, networking are what matter. With the 51st festival opening this week, Cannes regulars recall the highs and lows of a showbiz event like no other

Opening a Cannes of worms

Geoffrey Macnab sets the scene for another fortnight of film, fury and farce on the French Riveria

Burke posts British triumph but Cannes critics unmoved

The British actress Kathy Burke last night won Best Actress at the 50th Cannes Film Festival. Burke, known to millions of television viewers as Waynetta Slob in Harry Enfield & Friends, won for her performance in Nil By Mouth, directed by Gary Oldman.

Cannon fodder

From 'Revenge of the Ninja' to 'Delta Force', director / producer Menachem Golan is noted more for the quantity than the quality of his output. Geoffrey Macnab met him on the Croisette in Cannes, where this year, like every other year since 1965, he has been promising more than he can possibly deliver

The last of the auteurs

Ingmar Bergman wasn't in Cannes to receive his gong. But would young film-goers really know who he (and others of his generation) were anyway, asks Geoffrey Macnab

Life's a beach for Labour's new minister for the movies

Perhaps it was the sight of all those yachts and designer swim wear. But it took the Cannes Film Festival to provoke a New Labour minister to talk about his socialist youth.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Ukraine crisis: The phoney war is over as Russian troops and armour pour across the border

The phoney war is over

Russian troops and armour pour into Ukraine
Potatoes could be off the menu as crop pests threaten UK

Potatoes could be off the menu as crop pests threaten UK

The world’s entire food system is under attack - and Britain is most at risk, according to a new study
Gangnam smile: why the Chinese are flocking to South Korea to buy a new face

Gangnam smile: why the Chinese are flocking to South Korea to buy a new face

Seoul's plastic surgery industry is booming thanks to the popularity of the K-Pop look
Salomé's feminine wiles have inspired writers, painters and musicians for 2,000 years

Salomé: A head for seduction

Salomé's feminine wiles have inspired writers, painters and musicians for 2,000 years. Now audiences can meet the Biblical femme fatale in two new stage and screen projects
From Bram Stoker to Stanley Kubrick, the British Library's latest exhibition celebrates all things Gothic

British Library celebrates all things Gothic

Forthcoming exhibition Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination will be the UK's largest ever celebration of Gothic literature
The Hard Rock Café's owners are embroiled in a bitter legal dispute - but is the restaurant chain worth fighting for?

Is the Hard Rock Café worth fighting for?

The restaurant chain's owners are currently embroiled in a bitter legal dispute
Caribbean cuisine is becoming increasingly popular in the UK ... and there's more to it than jerk chicken at carnival

In search of Caribbean soul food

Caribbean cuisine is becoming increasingly popular in the UK ... and there's more to it than jerk chicken at carnival
11 best face powders

11 best face powders

Sweep away shiny skin with our pick of the best pressed and loose powder bases
England vs Norway: Roy Hodgson's hands tied by exploding top flight

Roy Hodgson's hands tied by exploding top flight

Lack of Englishmen at leading Premier League clubs leaves manager hamstrung
Angel Di Maria and Cristiano Ronaldo: A tale of two Manchester United No 7s

Di Maria and Ronaldo: A tale of two Manchester United No 7s

They both inherited the iconic shirt at Old Trafford, but the £59.7m new boy is joining a club in a very different state
Israel-Gaza conflict: No victory for Israel despite weeks of death and devastation

Robert Fisk: No victory for Israel despite weeks of devastation

Palestinians have won: they are still in Gaza, and Hamas is still there
Mary Beard writes character reference for Twitter troll who called her a 'slut'

Unlikely friends: Mary Beard and the troll who called her a ‘filthy old slut’

The Cambridge University classicist even wrote the student a character reference
America’s new apartheid: Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone

America’s new apartheid

Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone
Amazon is buying Twitch for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?

What is the appeal of Twitch?

Amazon is buying the video-game-themed online streaming site for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?
Tip-tapping typewriters, ripe pongs and slides in the office: Bosses are inventing surprising ways of making us work harder

How bosses are making us work harder

As it is revealed that one newspaper office pumps out the sound of typewriters to increase productivity, Gillian Orr explores the other devices designed to motivate staff