Ministers deny plot to oust Brown – and call for unity

Senior cabinet ministers were forced to quash rumours of a plot to replace Gordon Brown as Prime Minister as they yesterday insisted that the Labour Party needed to rally round its leader.

Steve Richards: Gordon Brown has found problems will only erupt by remaining silent about tax policies

There is no longer the scope to raise money to pay for what voters fear is a big black hole

Leading article: After another fine mess, Mr Brown needs to show signs of conviction

After last week's calamitous defeat for the Labour Party in the town hall elections, it was imperative for Gordon Brown to steady the ship of Government and project an image of calm and authoritative leadership. Yet the Prime Minister has failed to provide any of this. Instead, he has stumbled from one imbroglio to another. Tragically, the only image that has been projected from Downing Street is one of haplessnessand desperation.

PM hints at prospect of concessions to tax rebels

Brown desperate to quell mounting revolt among Labour backbenchers in advance of the 1 May local elections. Jane Merrick reports

Charles Clarke lines up southern 'stalking horses' to challenge Brown's leadership

Former home secretary said to be collecting names of MPs in anticipation of a revolt against the PM if Labour does badly in 1 May local elections

Brown will upgrade cannabis to class B substance despite advice of drugs experts

Gordon Brown is preparing to override the views of his own expert advisers and tighten the law on cannabis.

Alan Watkins: Labour in power after 2010? Not on your nelly

Former home secretary Charles Clarke has been reflecting on the government's future. All very interesting – but not convincing

Clarke: Labour must focus on future

Labour could be out of power for more than a decade if the party "gets it wrong" in the run-up to the general election, Charles Clarke, the former home secretary, has warned.

Steve Richards: He injected life into politics and was a force for good. But Hain should have gone weeks ago

The resignation of Peter Hain was inevitable and necessary. Quite often, frenzied calls for Cabinet ministers to resign are made without much basis, though in this case the media was relatively subdued and restrained. Yet Hain should have bowed out several weeks ago.

Brown defends handling of banking crisis

Gordon Brown hinted at further cuts in interest rates yesterday after announcing he had consulted world leaders, including the US President George Bush, over the global banking crisis.

Alcopop adverts banned from TV

Two alcopop advertisements have been banned after falling foul of rules designed to protect under-18s.

BP's Browne may face Texas deaths probe

US safety watchdog carrying out 'detailed and copious investigation' into explosion last year

Karlsson and Broadhurst dreaming of Ryder Cup call

The charge for the Ryder Cup started for Robert Karlsson with this Wales Open victory here yesterday, while Paul Broadhurst's pursuit to the K Club quickened so markedly that a fairytale return to the Europe team after a 15-year absence has become a real likelihood.

Alternative religions: Paganism and prejudice

A march in London yesterday demonstrated the enduring popularity of polytheistic faiths. But adherents continue to come up against ignorance and distrust

Humans and bears: not so different after all

Charlie Russell set up home with grizzlies in the wild, and found himself the 'mother' to three orphaned cubs - all to prove that bears can coexist with humans
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Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence