Arts and Entertainment Robert Plant performs with the Sensational Space Shifters

For a Led Zeppelin reunion refusenik, Robert Plant does perform an awful lot of material by the group who defined seventies rock in all its magnificence and occasional self-indulgence.

Eugene Onegin, Glyndebourne Festival, Glyndebourne

When Graham Vick's pristine staging of Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin christened Glyndebourne's new theatre back in 1994, it was hard to imagine a realisation of this great piece that was truer to the elegance and fine detailing of the Pushkin original. It still is. Revived now by Ron Howell (Vick's one-time assistant) and Jacopo Spirei, the freshness and clear-sightedness of the vision continues to embody everything that is pure and classical and candid about Tchaikovsky's musical response to Pushkin. The wonder of this piece lies in its economy and restraint.

The Sixteen/Harry Christophers, Queen Elizabeth Hall, London

Concerts mixing recitations and music tend to prove a mixed blessing, entirely pleasing neither to music- lovers nor to the more literary minded. When a programme also involves a modicum of production – lighting effects, back-projections etc – it can too easily suggest a lack of faith in the music alone to speak.

Zehetmair Quartet, Wigmore hall, london

Under the leadership of the charismatic violinist Thomas Zehetmair, the Zehetmair Quartet have won a string of awards for their recordings of Schumann, Hindemith and Bartok. They only tour one or two programmes a year, but play their full repertoire from memory. Presumably, the idea is that this will enable the players to interact more spontaneously. Alas, on the evidence of this Wigmore Hall concert, it conduces rather to mannerism and eccentricity.

Laulala keeps Crusaders on top of the pile Down Under

Canterbury Crusaders beat their fellow New Zealand side Wellington Hurricanes 19-12 here to win the inaugural Super 14 final. Canterbury's outside-centre Casey Laulala scored the only try of a match played in thick fog, while their fly-half Dan Carter kicked four penalties and a conversion.

Album: Various artists

Strangely Strange but Oddly Normal - An Island Anthology 1967-1972, ISLAND

Carmen, Royal Albert Hall, London

A Carmen without passion

From Madras to movies - Cobra beer sheds its skin

Having struck gold with the less gassy beer, now the silver screen beckons too

La Bohÿme, Glyndebourne on Tour, Touring

A cold snap descended on the South Downs for the first night of Glyndebourne on Tour's La Bohème, a revival of David McVicar's 2000 touring production.

Nash Ensemble/Paul Kildea, Wigmore Hall, London

New logo, new era? The current management of the Wigmore Hall has certainly gone heavily for interior decoration.

RAH Organ, Inaugural Concert, Royal Albert Hall, London

Three decades ago, the organ builder Noel Mander, now aged 90, was present for Robert Munns's inaugural recital at the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Day Saints in Exhibition Road, a pebble's throw from the Royal Albert Hall and Sir Malcolm Sargent's adjacent apartment. In Sargent's day, the Albert Hall's organ was serviced by Harrison & Harrison, who shipped in the famous console and wired the thing up. Exit steam engines; enter electronic blowers, plus 2,000 extra medial pipes, with some loss of differentiation but numerous musical gains.

Rodelinda, Glyndebourne Festival

A queen ready for her close-up

Pelléas et Mélisande, Glyndebourne

Death and the maiden

Let's all gather round the tabla

A variety show on India Republic Day is just one part of a pan-Asian peace project

The incredible string band

The cellist Richard Jenkinson brings his innovative ensemble to London's Wigmore Hall
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