News Jeremy Paxman has taken issue the plans to 'celebrate' next year's centenary of the First World War

The Newsnight veteran is unhappy at Cameron's take on next year's first world war centenary

Simon Pegg: A grave new world

The comic talks to James Rampton about his new movie in which he takes on the undead

Books: In search of a life less ordinary - and more risky

Would you like to take a holiday from yourself? Mary Allen enjoys a couple of chilling trips across the frontiers of personality

Satellite: Pick of the Day

WHAT BETTER way to spend a Bank Holiday Monday than in the company of Ewan McGregor (right). A evening of his work kicks off with the premiere of A Life Less Ordinary (10pm FilmFour), his third film with Danny Boyle, Andrew Macdonald and John Hodge. In this delicious black comedy wittily directed by Boyle, McGregor plays a disaffected cleaner who tries to boost his fortunes by kidnapping the boss's daughter (the delightful Cameron Diaz). At the same time, in a typically surreal touch, two angels (Holly Hunter and Delroy Lindo) are trying their damnedest to make the couple fall in love. This is followed by McGregor's two previous efforts with the same creative team, the murderously dark comedy, Shallow Grave (11.50pm) and the startlingly original drug drama, Trainspotting (1.40am), which features Robert Carlyle.

The Saturday Profile: Robert Carlyle, Actor: A man for all regions

NOBODY LIKES to criticise Robert Carlyle. Fans of lo-fi kitchen sink misery love him for his work with Ken Loach, and point out that he's one of the few actors whom the director has cast twice.

Addicted to the starring role: Ewan McGregor

The Saturday Profile; EWAN MCGREGOR, ACTOR

Television Review: The Young Person's Guide to Becoming a Rock Star

EVERYONE WANTS to be Danny Boyle and John Hodge these days. It's dangerous, though, to invite comparisons. The Young Person's Guide to Becoming a Rock Star (C4) did so at trailer stage by presenting us with mugshots of the main characters, with hash marks appended, an obvious lift from the posters for Trainspotting which every PR agency in the land used for their Christmas 1996 party invitations, and a tough analogy for the poor writer, Bryan Elsley, to live up to.

Classic yarns beat tales of 90s low life

THE SCOTTISH novel about drugs and low life, Trainspotting, which has also become a hit film, remains less popular in its home country than classics such as Robert Louis Stevenson's Kidnapped and Treasure Island.

Edinburgh 98: King of the hooligan element

A major retrospective of the shocking, uncompromising work of the late Alan Clarke shows just why the reputation of this courageous director continues to grow

BEST-SELLERS: VIDEO RENTAL

1 Copland (18)

Film: Trendspotting: Four's shot in the arm for new movies

The relationship between cinema and television was changed 15 years ago with the launch of `Film on Four'. Not just because television ceased to be merely a consumer of films but, as Sarah Gristwood argues, because it created some of the finest of our contemporary movies.

Wide angle: Just what the doctor ordered

John Hodge combines a career as a doctor with that of a successful screenwriter - the title of his latest, A Life Less Ordinary, could sum up the man himself

Interview: A team less ordinary

`A Life Less Ordinary' is a strange film. Even its screenwriter thinks so. But then, as Ben Thompson discovers, that's just the kind of creative dissent you'd expect from the trio that made `Trainspotting'

Arts: A cast more extraordinary

Forget Eton, Cambridge, Rada. The class of 'Trainspotting' are graduating top of them all. By Daniel Rosenthal

Film: Scandinavia's answer to `Trainspotting'

Nicolas Winding Refn has long been at odds with society. For his debut film, `Pusher', he moved into the dark world of the drugs dealers. Nick Hasted meets the clear-eyed `infiltrator'

Not half bad at English, considering ...

In the summer months Britain becomes home for crowds of foreigners seeking a cool and damp change from the blazing sunshine at home. When they arrive here, they discover an unsuspected hazard: the English language. The trouble with the English language, many of them complain to me, is that it is not spoken the same way that it is taught at home, and is full of phrases like "Don't mind if I do" and "Brass monkey weather", which are quite inexplicable.
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