News Trespass laws are being examined to allow fracking under people's homes without prior consent

Ministers are reportedly reviewing laws that would allow fracking to be carried out underneath houses without the permission of the owners.

How Sarah Palin's road trip turned into a car crash

The release of thousands of emails from her time in office caps an uncomfortable week for the Tea Party star

Bill Clements: Oilman and politician who broke the Democrat stranglehold on Texas

The truly distinguishing feature of Bill Clements was not his outsize Texas personality – complete with a rags-to-riches ascent from oil-patch roughnecker to powerhouse industrialist, a straight-shooting and often acerbic style, and a blithe indifference to what lesser men might consider gaffes. It was that he transformed the politics of the second most populous state in the union, eclipsed today in presidential electoral votes only by California.

Tevez's legs were still willing – but his heart clearly lies elsewhere

As City waved goodbye to a trophyless era, their captain was refusing to commit his future

Brett Richards: The miner seeking gold with growth

The Business Interview: Avocet Mining has its sights firmly set on adding as many ounces as it can in West Africa, its chief executive tells Nikhil Kumar

Chalk Talk: Surprise, surprise - it's state-school pupils who are the real stars

Oh ye of little faith! When Cambridge University announced last year it was to become one of the first in the country to insist on at least one A* grade at A-level from candidates for places, there was a chorus of disapproval. It was a typically elitist move from an elite university, which would benefit pupils in independent schools – where their teachers would be more likely to drill and push them into getting A*s.

Who needs an allotment if you've got a city-centre balcony?

It's all very well all the smug gardeners you know going on about which heritage veg they are sowing this year. But what happens if all your outside space is covered in Tarmacadam, thank you very much? And located a handy seven flights up? In the past, you'd have had to pick your way through conventional veg-growing books to find the little bits that apply to you, fast-forwarding, wistfully, through the sections on double-digging and where to put the compost heap.

DIY for dummies

New classes for the DIY illiterate are bringing back those long forgotten skills, says Annie Deakin

Chinese police detain dissident artist Ai Weiwei at airport

Ai Weiwei, China's most controversial artist, was detained by police as he boarded a flight at Beijing airport yesterday, the highest-profile action yet in a clampdown on dissenting voices.

Earth matters: Anna Pavord's mulching masterclass

You can shower it in fertiliser and TLC, but a plant is nothing without decent soil

Fox and Grapes, 9 Camp Road, Wimbledon Common, London

Underground, overground, hurrying to Wimbledon Common, here come the foodies. Their destination, a gastropub on the common's edge which recently reopened under new management. Clearly the Fox and Grapes isn't just any gastropub. You could call it an astro-pub, given the two Michelin stars held by co-owner Claude Bosi, the hugely talented chef-proprietor of Hibiscus.

Tea Party tunes in to Bachmann's earner overdrive

Michele Bachmann's prolific fundraising is rocking the boat for Sarah Palin. Rupert Cornwell on the rise of a new political force

Japan prepares to restart work at nuclear plant

Surging radiation levels forced Japan to order emergency workers to temporarily withdraw from its crippled nuclear plant today, losing time in a desperate operation to cool the overheating reactors — the most urgent crisis from last week's devastating earthquake and tsunami.

Third blast heard at Japan nuclear plant

Japan's nuclear safety agency says an explosion has been heard at Unit 2 of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant.

Julian Knight: Pension timebomb? Call the forces of political correctness

You work longer and you pay more – you probably knew the drill before Lord Hutton released his report into public sector pensions last week.

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Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – Five-star MS Swiss Corona 7 nights from £999pp
Lake Como St Moritz & the Bernina Express 7 nights from £809pp
Vietnam
Lake Maggiore, Orta & the Matterhorn 7 nights from £939pp
South Africa
Spain
Prices correct as of 19 December 2014
A timely reminder of the bloody anniversary we all forgot

A timely reminder of the bloody anniversary we all forgot

Who remembers that this week we enter the 150th anniversary year of the end of the American Civil War, asks Robert Fisk
Homeless Veterans appeal: Former soldiers pay their respects to a friend who also served

Homeless Veterans appeal

Former soldiers pay their respects to a friend who also served
Downfall of Dustin 'Screech' Diamond, the 'Saved By The Bell' star charged with bar stabbing

Scarred by the bell

The downfall of the TV star charged with bar stabbing
Why 2014 was a year of technological let-downs

Why 2014 was a year of technological let-downs

Security breaches and overhyped start-ups dominated a year in which very little changed (save the size of your phone)
Cuba's golf revolution: But will the revolutionary nation take 'bourgeois' game to its heart?

Will revolutionary Cuba take 'bourgeois' golf to its heart?

Fidel Castro ridiculed the game – but now investment in leisure resort projects is welcome
The Locked Room Mysteries: As a new collection of the genre’s best is published, its editor Otto Penzler explains the rules of engagement

The Locked Room Mysteries

As a new collection of the genre’s best is published, its editor explains the rules of engagement
Amy Adams on playing painter Margaret Keane in Tim Burton's Big Eyes

How I made myself Keane

Amy Adams hadn’t wanted to take the role of artist Margaret Keane, because she’d had enough of playing victims. But then she had a daughter, and saw the painter in a new light
Ed Richards: Parting view of Ofcom chief. . . we hate jokes on the disabled

Parting view of Ofcom chief... we hate jokes on the disabled

Bad language once got TV viewers irate, inciting calls to broadcasting switchboards. But now there is a worse offender, says retiring head of the media watchdog, Ed Richards
A look back at fashion in 2014: Wear in review

Wear in review

A look back at fashion in 2014
Ian Herbert: My 10 hopes for sport in 2015. Might just one of them happen?

Ian Herbert: My 10 hopes for sport in 2015

Might just one of them happen?
War with Isis: The West needs more than a White Knight

The West needs more than a White Knight

Despite billions spent on weapons, the US has not been able to counter Isis's gruesome tactics, says Patrick Cockburn
Return to Helmand: Private Davey Graham recalls the day he was shot by the Taliban

'The day I was shot by the Taliban'

Private Davey Graham was shot five times during an ambush in 2007 - it was the first, controversial photograph to show the dangers our soldiers faced in Helmand province
Revealed: the best and worst airlines for delays

Revealed: the best and worst airlines for delays

Many flyers are failing to claim compensation to which they are entitled, a new survey has found
The stories that defined 2014: From the Scottish independence referendum to the Ice Bucket Challenge, our writers voice their opinions

The stories that defined 2014

From the Scottish independence referendum to the Ice Bucket Challenge, our writers voice their opinions
Stoke-on-Trent becomes first British city to be classified as 'disaster resilient' by the United Nations

Disaster looming? Now you know where to head...

Which British city has become the first to be awarded special 'resilience' status by the UN?