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Customers holding a loyalty card get a free cup of coffee

The number 30 double-decker bus in Tavistock Square, which was destroyed by a terrorist bomb on 7 July 2005

We're foiling 7/7-size plot every year, says counter-terror chief as he warns of rise in smaller groups

Counter-terror teams are foiling a plot as big as the July 7 attacks every year, a senior police officer has revealed.

The Insider: Miniature gardening (minus the garden)

Who needs flowerpots? Whether you're planting indoors or on a windowsill, patio or balcony – or even in a garden with (like mine) minimal flowerbed space – take tips from a lovely new book, Teeny, Tiny Gardening by Emma Hardy (£14,99, Cico). It is stuffed with inventive ideas for weeny things you can turn into quirky planters. Such as…

A nation of 'secret boozers': English people underestimate how much alcohol they drink

Studies show self-reported alcohol consumption accounts for only 40 to 60 per cent of sales

‘Last year I got $2.20 per pound, this year $1.40’ Gerardo Arias Camacho, 43, a coffee farmer from Costa Rica

Too much power in too few hands: Food giants take over the industry

Small producers face poverty as ever more commodities are controlled by a coterie of multinationals

Swedish squadron fuelled by coffee made with radiator water

When Captain Catharina Bergsell poured herself her morning coffee at the Blekinge Air Force base in southern Sweden, she would often muse that it was a little on the murky side, but just put it down to the usual questionable quality of vending machine beverages.

Stranded Somerset drivers forced to bed down in Nether Stowey village hall

Thirty people were forced to spend the night in a village hall after being rescued by police when they became stranded in their cars because of snow.

You can have this afterwards

A procrastinator’s guide to tackling exam stress

Exams, like death and taxes, are one of life's few constants. If you're struggling with your revision, maybe these study tips from fellow procrastinator Helen Vaudrey might help?

Police child protection officer 'spiked Lucozade with screenwash because people kept stealing it'

A Metropolitan police child protection officer has been charged after allegedly spiking a bottle of Lucozade with screenwash.

James Moore: Maybe the competition authorities should look at the magic of cinema

Outlook In the 1930s, the last time the economy saw such a sustained period of awfulness, there was at least the cinema for a bit of escapism. Hollywood was in its golden age, churning out classic after classic, seemingly at will. And while conservatives with a nostalgia fixation need to realise that the notion of the "good old days" is a myth (look up words like diphtheria, measles and whooping cough) viewing those classics was ridiculously cheap. You probably could see a couple of films and get the bus home for a handful of pennies after a fish supper.

Traditional conker matches between schoolchildren are banned as they represent a safety risk

It's health and safety gone... very sensible

Safety myths that saw knives banned in kitchens and umbrellas banned in the rain have been debunked by the Government's health and safety watchdog.

Vomiting, fights, blood, tears...The hell of working Black Friday

Some top tips if you want to have a good night and get served

Starbucks agrees to pay more tax in Britain

Coffee giant says it expects to pay 'somewhere in the range of £10 million' in UK corporation tax for each of the next two years.

Forget the vodka, make mine a malt, Vladimir

It's as Russian as Tolstoy's Anna Karenina and the Siberian steppe but vodka has a new challenger as the world's fourth-heaviest drinking nation's spirit of choice. This month, Beam, which owns Jim Beam and Maker's Mark, has become the latest distiller to announce that it hopes to double its whisky sales there. .

“I would rather,” ventured Michael Clarke on the eve of leading Australia into this series with South Africa, “get a duck and win”

Clarke’s Bradman-like batting lies at the heart of Australia’s revival

Clarke has been at the heart as batsman and leader

Starbucks: The US coffee company has paid £8m in tax on £3bn in sales during 14 years in the UK

Starbucks faces MPs over tax avoidance

Starbucks coffee shops across the country will be the target of demonstrations by anti-tax avoidance activists, the protest group UK Uncut has announced.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project
Diana Krall: The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai

Diana Krall interview

The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai
Pinstriped for action: A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter

Pinstriped for action

A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter
Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: 'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'

Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: How we met

'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef serves up his favourite Japanese dishes

Bill Granger's Japanese recipes

Stock up on mirin, soy and miso and you have the makings of everyday Japanese cuisine
Michael Calvin: How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us

Michael Calvin's Last Word

How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us