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Customers holding a loyalty card get a free cup of coffee

The number 30 double-decker bus in Tavistock Square, which was destroyed by a terrorist bomb on 7 July 2005

We're foiling 7/7-size plot every year, says counter-terror chief as he warns of rise in smaller groups

Counter-terror teams are foiling a plot as big as the July 7 attacks every year, a senior police officer has revealed.

The Insider: Miniature gardening (minus the garden)

Who needs flowerpots? Whether you're planting indoors or on a windowsill, patio or balcony – or even in a garden with (like mine) minimal flowerbed space – take tips from a lovely new book, Teeny, Tiny Gardening by Emma Hardy (£14,99, Cico). It is stuffed with inventive ideas for weeny things you can turn into quirky planters. Such as…

A nation of 'secret boozers': English people underestimate how much alcohol they drink

Studies show self-reported alcohol consumption accounts for only 40 to 60 per cent of sales

‘Last year I got $2.20 per pound, this year $1.40’ Gerardo Arias Camacho, 43, a coffee farmer from Costa Rica

Too much power in too few hands: Food giants take over the industry

Small producers face poverty as ever more commodities are controlled by a coterie of multinationals

Swedish squadron fuelled by coffee made with radiator water

When Captain Catharina Bergsell poured herself her morning coffee at the Blekinge Air Force base in southern Sweden, she would often muse that it was a little on the murky side, but just put it down to the usual questionable quality of vending machine beverages.

Stranded Somerset drivers forced to bed down in Nether Stowey village hall

Thirty people were forced to spend the night in a village hall after being rescued by police when they became stranded in their cars because of snow.

You can have this afterwards

A procrastinator’s guide to tackling exam stress

Exams, like death and taxes, are one of life's few constants. If you're struggling with your revision, maybe these study tips from fellow procrastinator Helen Vaudrey might help?

Police child protection officer 'spiked Lucozade with screenwash because people kept stealing it'

A Metropolitan police child protection officer has been charged after allegedly spiking a bottle of Lucozade with screenwash.

James Moore: Maybe the competition authorities should look at the magic of cinema

Outlook In the 1930s, the last time the economy saw such a sustained period of awfulness, there was at least the cinema for a bit of escapism. Hollywood was in its golden age, churning out classic after classic, seemingly at will. And while conservatives with a nostalgia fixation need to realise that the notion of the "good old days" is a myth (look up words like diphtheria, measles and whooping cough) viewing those classics was ridiculously cheap. You probably could see a couple of films and get the bus home for a handful of pennies after a fish supper.

Traditional conker matches between schoolchildren are banned as they represent a safety risk

It's health and safety gone... very sensible

Safety myths that saw knives banned in kitchens and umbrellas banned in the rain have been debunked by the Government's health and safety watchdog.

Vomiting, fights, blood, tears...The hell of working Black Friday

Some top tips if you want to have a good night and get served

Starbucks agrees to pay more tax in Britain

Coffee giant says it expects to pay 'somewhere in the range of £10 million' in UK corporation tax for each of the next two years.

Forget the vodka, make mine a malt, Vladimir

It's as Russian as Tolstoy's Anna Karenina and the Siberian steppe but vodka has a new challenger as the world's fourth-heaviest drinking nation's spirit of choice. This month, Beam, which owns Jim Beam and Maker's Mark, has become the latest distiller to announce that it hopes to double its whisky sales there. .

“I would rather,” ventured Michael Clarke on the eve of leading Australia into this series with South Africa, “get a duck and win”

Clarke’s Bradman-like batting lies at the heart of Australia’s revival

Clarke has been at the heart as batsman and leader

Starbucks: The US coffee company has paid £8m in tax on £3bn in sales during 14 years in the UK

Starbucks faces MPs over tax avoidance

Starbucks coffee shops across the country will be the target of demonstrations by anti-tax avoidance activists, the protest group UK Uncut has announced.

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The Ridiculous Six has been produced by Adam Sandler, who also stars in it
filmNew controversy after nine Native American actors walked off set
Sport
Danny Jones was in the Wales squad for the 2013 World Cup
rugby leagueKeighley Cougars half-back was taken off after just four minutes
Life and Style
The original ZX Spectrum was simple to plug into your TV and get playing on
techThirty years on, the ZX Spectrum is back, after a fashion
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football
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Google celebrates Bartolomeo Cristofori's 360th birthday
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The Mattehorn stands reflected in Leisee lake near Sunnegga station on June 30, 2013 near Zermatt, Switzerland
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 1 May 2015
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Russell Brand's interview with Ed Miliband has got everyone talking about The Trews

Everyone is talking about The Trews

Russell Brand's 'true news' videos attract millions of viewers. But today's 'Milibrand' interview introduced his resolutely amateurish style to a whole new crowd
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before
'Queer saint' Peter Watson left his mark on British culture by bankrolling artworld giants

'Queer saint' who bankrolled artworld giants

British culture owes a huge debt to Peter Watson, says Michael Prodger
Pushkin Prizes: Unusual exchange programme aims to bring countries together through culture

Pushkin Prizes brings countries together

Ten Scottish schoolchildren and their Russian peers attended a creative writing workshop in the Highlands this week
14 best kids' hoodies

14 best kids' hoodies

Don't get caught out by that wind on the beach. Zip them up in a lightweight top to see them through summer to autumn
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The acceptable face of the Emirates

The acceptable face of the Emirates

Has Abu Dhabi found a way to blend petrodollars with principles, asks Robert Fisk