News Workers at mail-order company La Redoute protest in Lille against plans to sack 1,200 workers

3.2 million people are working so hard that they risked mental or physical breakdown, study finds

Football: Graham's challenge lifts Ginola

DAVID GINOLA, the artist who has been labelled the best footballer in the world by Dutch master Johan Cruyff, knows the day may never dawn when he earns anything like such a glowing reference from George Graham.

Company of the week: Marks and Spencer

MARKS AND SPENCER, Britain's largest clothing retailer, said it will axe 31 of its top 125 managers - including three board members - in a reorganisation that will result in an exceptional charge of pounds 10m in fiscal 1999.

Education letter: Exhausted, underpaid: and that's a good day

Anthea Millett (`Why we need to raise our game,' EDUCATION 11 February) needs to come down from her ivory tower and do the very thing she complains teachers do not do: talk to people. Anyone who can assert the belief that the profession is in fair shape is quite simply out of touch. It needs only a small amount of research to demonstrate the reality. The haemorrhage of experienced teachers out of the profession and into early retirement has been so great that the teachers' pension fund is in dire straits and a Berlin Wall has been erected to stem the flood of refugees. Meanwhile, insurance companies have moved teachers into the high-risk band, along with pilots and surgeons. Those are not the signs of a profession that is in fair shape.

Obituary: Peter Bowling

HARRY BOWLING, "King of the Cockney Sagas", was 57 before he wrote his first novel, Conner Street's War, set in the London docklands at the outbreak of the Second World War. It was the first of 18 bestselling cockney sagas that, like Ironmonger's Daughter, Tuppence To Tooley Street or his last, The Whispering Years (to be published in June), told poignant, nostalgic - but not romanticised - stories of good-hearted ordinary people in extraordinary circumstances in close-knit south London communities.

Letter: Ageist jobs bias

Sir: The decline in job prospects for men approaching retirement age is blamed on the high cost of funding salary-related pensions ("Jobs for middle-aged men vanishing", 8 February).

`Greying grannies' get radical

Gay parenting is the Townswomen's Guilds' latest issue, reports Jane Hughes

Personal Finance: Money Q&A - Sterling future for your euro windfall

We want to make the most of Fr500,000 we are about to get (in euros) from the sale of our house in France. A large part of the money will be used to pay off a mortgage. The rest we could keep in a French franc/euro bank account, or we could possibly put it in European-based PEPs. Any thoughts would be welcome. We are hoping to take early retirement even though our pensions are inadequate.

Snooker: Old rivalry in young man's game

Snooker, now the province of teenage talent, makes way for Steve Davis and Joe Johnson, both world champions of yesteryear.

The schools that will always lose out

"WHEN I look at some of the inner-city schooling, it is no wonder parents feel they have to move out, or feel that they have to make other arrangements for their children." Speaking on the radio last week, the Prime Minister was at his fatherly, honest, responsible best. And, of course, he is right; it is indeed no wonder that parents feel they have to move out or make other arrangements. What is a wonder, however, is that the obvious humbug - or at the very least class blindness - of Mr Blair's observation went largely unnoticed.

Ulcer puts Yeltsin back in hospital

PRESIDENT Boris Yeltsin, who had just started to make his mark on Russian politics again after illness, was taken back to hospital yesterday, this time suffering from what his press service called a bleeding stomach ulcer. His retreat to the Central Clinical Hospital was bound to set off new calls for his early retirement.

First the murderers walk free. Now the Lawrence police escape justice

THESE ARE the five men who bear the lion's share of responsibility for the failure to bring to justice Stephen Lawrence's racist killers. With four of them already enjoyingretirement on full pension, it emerged yesterday that the fifth is to follow suit - meaning that no police officer in the Lawrence case will ever be punished.

Lawrence detective quits ahead of hearing

THE ONLY police officer facing censure over his handling of the Stephen Lawrence murder inquiry has resigned and will not now appear before a disciplinary hearing.

Rugby Union: Uttley shown door as RFU sheds 30 jobs

ROGER UTTLEY and Don Rutherford, two of the most influential figures in post-war English rugby, were among the big-name fall guys yesterday as Francis Baron, the new chief executive of the Rugby Football Union, ripped through Twickenham like a supercharged Jonah Lomu. Uttley, the England team manager, and Rutherford, the national director of rugby, saw their jobs disappear as Baron completed his first cost-cutting assault on the badged and blazered ranks of RFU officialdom.
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Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee