Tuesday Book: The indiscreet charm of the bureaucracy

The Power Behind the Prime Minister: the hidden influence of number ten by Dennis Kavanagh and Anthony Sheldon (HarperCollins, pounds 19.99)

Sailing: Ogden breezes to double victory

END OF term means prize givings and, although today sees the final races in Skandia Life Cowes Week, some hashes were just about settled yesterday. The fleet of 900 boats was already depleted by those who were preparing for the Fastnet Race, which begins this evening, but Peter Ogden was in fine form, completing a double win in his Swan 60, Spirit of Jethou.

Sailing: Ogden breezes in for double

END OF term means prize givings and, although today sees the final races in Skandia Life Cowes Week, some hashes were just about settled yesterday. The fleet of 900 boats was already depleted by those who were preparing for the Fastnet Race, which begins this evening, but Peter Ogden was in fine form, completing a double win in his Swan 60, Spirit of Jethou.

Single Currency: Bullish Blair denies softening line on Britain's currency plans

TONY BLAIR came out fighting for the pro-European cause yesterday and insisted that he had not watered down his plans to take Britain into the single currency.

Whitelaw, the loyal lieutenant, dies at 81

LORD WHITELAW, the former Deputy Prime Minister and "sheet anchor" of Margaret Thatcher's government, has died aged 81, his family announced yesterday.

Action Replay: Golf: Jacklin wins historic US Open title

A famous sporting double was celebrated on 21 June, 1970. In Mexico City a majestic Brazilian team swept to victory in football's World Cup, beating Italy 4-1 in the final, while further north, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, British golfer Tony Jacklin surprised the world when he won the US Open Championship. This how the Daily Mirror's John Smith relayed the news of Jacklin's triumph.

Aitken is a bad lot but I have a soft spot for him

There is no intention to turn this column into a weekly edition of the sayings of William Whitelaw. But this Sunday it is relevant to recall another Willieism. It was at Brighton during a Conservative conference in the 1970s, with the party in opposition and Margaret Thatcher leader. The Labour government was being threatened by the miners. Edward Heath, beginning his Great Sulk, told the assembled Tories that they ought not to gloat. Afterwards Lord Whitelaw remarked to Mr Frank Johnson and myself: "Ted said we shouldn't gloat, wrong to gloat, mustn't do it, no, no, no. Well, I can tell you, I'm gloating like hell."

Hague's line attacked

WILLIAM HAGUE'S strategy for winning votes in the European elections by attacking European Commission fraud was criticised by Sir Edward Heath as being too Eurosceptic .

Hague told `win or you're out'

THE THREAT to William Hague as Tory leader grew last night as his party's whips launched a desperate attempt to head off moves by his MPs to sack him. Mr Hague has lost the support of leading figures on the 1922 Committee of Tory MPs, whose executive committee has a crucial role in deciding his fate.

The Week In Westminster: So now we know, Lilley is for turning after all earns the wrath of Tory faithful

THE DEPUTY leader of the Conservative Party, Peter Lilley, has faced a barrage of almost universal criticism and ridicule from Tory backbenchers and several members of the Shadow Cabinet for his change of tone towards health and other public services.

Town with a heritage trail but no future Even of the off-licence can't get enough trade

IF YOU had followed the tourist board's heritage trail in Govan yesterday, you would have witnessed the end of an era. At site number 13 on the tour stood idle cranes as workers at the UK's biggest merchant shipyard contemplated its likely closure.

Obituary: Major Donald Henderson

MEN SUCH as Donald Henderson are always rightly referred to as bomb disposal experts - they have to be expert if they are to survive.

Parliament Standards: Rebuke for Heath over advisory fees

THE FORMER prime minister Sir Edward Heath received an official rebuke yesterday for failing to declare paid advisory posts on the register of members' interests.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
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Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn