News Jack Hammersley and Jorge Gill recreated wakeboarding, similar to that pictured, in a carpark in Guildford

Jack Hammersley and Jorge Gill were criticised for using a pulley system to wakeboard in an underground carpark

Buffeted by east winds

THERE was a dazzling array of super-advanced jetliners on display at the Singapore air show last week. Airbus Industrie brought the A3XX, a 550-seat, 80ft-high behemoth with space for a gym, bar and restaurant. The aisles were even wide enough to allow two people to pass each other with ease. Meanwhile, Boeing showed off a new model of its 777 that can fly for 18 hours non-stop, with space for 42 bunks below deck.

Outlook: BAe won't be fooled into playing French cricket

IT ALWAYS did look hopelessly optimistic to expect the aerospace industries of Europe to come up with a battle plan for rationalisation in the space of three months. That was what the politicians wanted but given the long years these companies have already spent dancing around the idea of consolidation, it never seemed very likely.

Finance: Policies to shrink home insurance

If you are among the many homeowners whose properties have risen in value by many tens of thousands in the past two years - congratulations. By a strange quirk of fate you may also be in line for a even better deal when it comes to insuring your property. Nic Cicutti explains how you could cut your insurance bills - by going up-market.

Obituary: Lord Kings Norton

Harold Roxbee Cox, aeronautical engineer: born Birmingham 6 June 1902; Lecturer in Aircraft Structures, Imperial College, London 1932-38; Principal Scientific Officer, Aerodynamics Department, RAE 1935-36, Head of Air Defence Department 1936-38, Superintendent of Scientific Research 1939-40; Chief Technical Officer, Air Registration Board 1938-39; Deputy Director of Scientific Research, Ministry of Aircraft Production 1940- 43, Director of Special Projects, 1943-44; chairman and managing director, Power Jets (Research and Development) 1944-46; Director, National Gas Turbine Establishment 1946-48; Chief Scientist, Ministry of Fuel and Power 1948-54; created 1965 Baron Kings Norton; Chancellor, Cranfield University (formerly Cranfield Institute of Technology) 1969-97; married 1927 Marjorie Withers (died 1980; two sons), 1982 Joan Pascoe (nee Pack); died 21 December 1997.

Private jets seek Farnborough take-off

TAG Group aims to turn MoD site into a designated airport for business travellers. Andrea Rothman reports

Letter: Tests on animals

Sir: The Government's decision to ban testing of finished cosmetics on animals (report, 6 November) may be seen as a victory, but the size of the victory is scant for such an important issue. While working as a laboratory animal technician, it has not been unusual for me to see the death of as many animals in a day as have been saved annually by this move.

Letter: Critics should be able to take it

How amazing to see that Julian Critchley couldn't take thecriticism by Martin Rowson (Review, 19 October) of Sir Julian's book, Collapse Of Stout Party.

Sixth-formers forced to pay to study for A-levels

Sixth-form colleges are charging students up-front fees of up to pounds 120 to enrol for A-levels courses although, by law, tuition must be free for students up to the age of 18. Lucy Ward and Louise Hancock found cash-strapped colleges asking parents to bail them out.

Football: FAN'S EYE VIEW: No 221: Farnborough Town

I first stood on the terraces at Cherrywood Road almost 20 years ago and I've never really thought of sampling my football anywhere else.

Hollick rules out cable merger

The cable industry was dealt a fresh blow yesterday after it emerged United News & Media, Lord Hollick's media conglomerate, had ruled out joining merger talks with cable operators Telewest and NTL. Separately, NTL also announced a large restructuring which will mean the loss of 50 jobs.

Detective made sex phone calls

A detective, who posed as a BT engineer in an elaborate ruse to bombard women with hundreds of sexually explicit phone calls, was placed on probation yesterday. Magistrates at Basingstoke, Hampshire, were told that Detective Constable Ian Thomas, 37, would choose telephone numbers at random - and on one evening made more than 50 calls from the police station where he worked.

Excalibur lands Druid in hot water

Arthur Pendragon, Senior Druid and chief of the Royal Arthur War Band, was yesterday committed for trial accused of carrying his ceremonial sword and dagger as offensive weapons.

High-flying award for young letter-writer

An eight-year-old boy with reading difficulties has won a letter- writing contest - with an application for the job of squadron leader.

Letter: Spaced out in the Millennium

Sir: Plans for the Millennium Exhibition at Greenwich really do need livening up (Letters, 27 June). One of the activities certain to dominate the 21st century is space technology to which Britain has made valuable contributions through international programmes.

What defence toys really cost us

Tony Blair has just announced that he is to purchase a fleet of 232 magnificent Rolls-Royces for his government. Each one of them is so state-of-the-art that they cost more than pounds 60m. "What does the Government need them for?" you might ask. But no one is asking. The extraordinary thing is that such a question just isn't on the agenda. Oddly enough, there are no rumbles of protest at this extravagance - not a whisper, not even from the Treasury. These dream machines are justified on the grounds that building them will provide thousands of jobs. The Rolls-Royces have been redefined as a job-creation scheme, no problem.
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A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting
Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

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A writer spends a night on the streets

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Striking new stations, high-speed links and (whisper it) better services - the UK's railways are entering a new golden age

UK's railways are entering a new golden age

New stations are opening across the country and our railways appear to be entering an era not seen in Britain since the early 1950s
Conchita Wurst becomes a 'bride' on the Paris catwalk - and proves there is life after Eurovision

Conchita becomes a 'bride' on Paris catwalk

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This year's most acrimonious sporting event took place in France, not Brazil. How did pétanque get so passionate?
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In the shade: 10 best women's sunglasses

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Germany vs Argentina World Cup 2014: Lionel Messi? Javier Mascherano is key for Argentina...

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Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer knows she needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

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The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

A future Palestine state will have no borders and be an enclave within Israel, surrounded on all sides by Israeli-held territory, says Robert Fisk
A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: The German people demand an end to the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

The German people demand an end to the fighting
New play by Oscar Wilde's grandson reveals what the Irish wit said at his trials

New play reveals what Oscar Wilde said at trials

For a century, what Wilde actually said at his trials was a mystery. But the recent discovery of shorthand notes changed that. Now his grandson Merlin Holland has turned them into a play
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Richard III, Trafalgar Studios, review: Martin Freeman gives highly intelligent performance

Richard III review

Martin Freeman’s psychotic monarch is big on mockery but wanting in malice
Hollywood targets Asian audiences as US films enjoy record-breaking run at Chinese box office

Hollywood targets Asian audiences

The world's second biggest movie market is fast becoming the Hollywood studios' most crucial