News Dave Lee Travis, whose real name is David Patrick Griffin, arrives at Southwark Crown Court on 17 January 17 2014

Former Radio One disc jockey Dave Lee Travis has told his trial he is “astonished” at sex offence allegations against him and told jurors he is a “normal, decent human being”.

Let's kill Top of the Pops

The BBC has relaunched its flagship music programme - again. What a waste of time, says the former TotP chief Trevor Dann

John Otway: Fans with a plan for their man

You're 50 and you want a chart hit. How do you do it? John Otway tells Mary Novakovich the answer

If I Ruled The Airwaves

Comedian Dave Gorman Wallows In Nostalgia

CV - Chris Cowey Producer, `Top of the Pops'

I come from a village to the south of Sunderland, where what you usually did was work down a coal-mine or off-shore on an oil rig. But at school in the late Seventies, I developed an interest in drama, and was quite keen on the idea of teaching too. Television wasn't something I'd ever considered, but then Malcolm Gerrie, who was my English and drama teacher, got a job as a researcher with Tyne Tees TV. So, suddenly, there was this link with the world of TV - and Malcolm would often drag me into the studio and show me off as one of his star pupils.

Trade threat to axe aid for 'Top Of The Pops'

Top Of The Pops, the BBC's flagship pop music programme for more than 30 years, is now heavily subsidised by the record companies, The Independent has discovered.

Welcome to the Wogandome

The title of Top of the Pops Song for Europe Special (7pm BBC1) looks like a heinous category mistake. What has the glittering, evergreen charts programme got to do with a pap-fest like Eurovision? Well, ideally, pop is a quintessentially European, as well as British, thing. Germany is where the Beatles went to get good; Sweden gave us Abba; France gave us, ah, Vanessa Paradis...

Singled out for a life on the margins

SECOND THOUGHTS

Let me set you straight about frizz

Before you fork out for a perm, heed Monique Roffey's warning about the pitfalls of dreadlocks and hairballs

Less chat, more music

Matthew Bannister complained on a recent edition of Radio 4's Feedback that his station only seemed to attract critical attention when trying something new. This, he felt, was unfair, because pop radio requires a sense of familiarity, and of continuity, to be heard at its best. His critics needed to try to be more like ordinary listeners, which meant tuning in more than once.

UNDERRATED / We've never had it so good: The case for 'Top of the Pops'

Tony Blackburn has no doubt about it: Top of the Pops isn't what it used to be. Nothing, he noted during the celebrations for the programme's 30th anniversary over the New Year, is any good about it anymore. The music is crap, the presenters don't know their microphones from their elbows, the audience can't even dance like it used to.

'Naff' pop show celebrates three decades at No 1: Mary Braid discovers that despite its longevity 'Top of the Pops' still cannot shake off its detractors

WHEN Jimmy Savile launched Top of the Pops on New Year's Day 1964, from a church in Manchester, The Beatles were at number one with 'I Want to Hold Your Hand' and the programme was on a six-week trial.

OPERA / Top of the pops: Meredith Oakes on Music Theatre London's playful Cos fan tutte at the Queen Elizabeth Hall

Most actors learn to sing a bit. When a winning, limelit Desdemona quavers through Shakespeare's Willow Song, or a gym-built hero picks up a lute and bleats out an embarrassing serenade, that's when you see what a gulf there is between real singing and brave, amateur tunefulness.
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Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
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What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
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The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
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Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
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Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
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The 'scroungers’ fight back

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Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
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A Bible for billionaires

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Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
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Magna Carta Island goes on sale

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The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

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We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

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The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

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